Ionizing radiation in craniofacial surgery: A primer on dose and risks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An understanding of radiation dose and the anticipated risk to the patient is an important aspect of ordering radiological imaging studies responsibly. It is especially true for the pediatric practitioner because children are more vulnerable to the biological effects of radiation, such as radiosensitivity, longer lifetime years, and higher cellular mitotic activity. The use of fluoroscopy and computed tomography is commonplace in the practice of craniofacial surgery, but often dose reports from varied investigations are not directly comparable, and the risk of patient harm from the investigation is unclear. This article presents the fundamentals of radiation, dose, and risk as it applies to radiological imaging and also introduces our low dose craniofacial computed tomography protocol.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)446-452
Number of pages7
JournalCleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal
Volume54
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2017

Fingerprint

Ionizing Radiation
Tomography
Radiation
Patient Harm
Radiation Tolerance
Fluoroscopy
Radiation Effects
Pediatrics

Keywords

  • Biological effects of radiation
  • Computed tomography
  • Ionizing radiation
  • Radiation dose
  • Radiation risk

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oral Surgery
  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

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abstract = "An understanding of radiation dose and the anticipated risk to the patient is an important aspect of ordering radiological imaging studies responsibly. It is especially true for the pediatric practitioner because children are more vulnerable to the biological effects of radiation, such as radiosensitivity, longer lifetime years, and higher cellular mitotic activity. The use of fluoroscopy and computed tomography is commonplace in the practice of craniofacial surgery, but often dose reports from varied investigations are not directly comparable, and the risk of patient harm from the investigation is unclear. This article presents the fundamentals of radiation, dose, and risk as it applies to radiological imaging and also introduces our low dose craniofacial computed tomography protocol.",
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AU - Koral, Korgun

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