Is the minimally invasive trauma surgeon the next (r)evolution of trauma surgery? Indications and outcomes of diagnostic and therapeutic trauma laparoscopy in a level 1 trauma centre

TraumaLap Study Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate the trend in use, feasibility and safety of laparoscopy in a single level 1 European trauma centre. Laparoscopy in abdominal trauma is gaining acceptance as a diagnostic and a therapeutic tool as it reduces surgical invasiveness and may reduce post-operative morbidity. All trauma patients who underwent a laparoscopic procedure between January 2013 and December 2017 were retrospectively analysed. A sub-analysis of isolated abdominal trauma was also performed. There has been a significant increase in the use of this technique in the considered time period. A total of 40 patients were included in the study: 17 diagnostic laparoscopies and overall 32 therapeutic laparoscopies. Conversion rate was 15%. All patients were hemodynamically stable. The majority of patients were younger than 60 years, with an ASA score of I–II and sustained a blunt trauma. Mean ISS score was 17. Colon and diaphragm were the most commonly laparoscopically diagnosed injuries, while splenectomy was the most common operation. The average operating time was 106 min. There were no missed injuries, no SSI, no re-interventions and no mortality related to the surgical procedure. The average length of stay was 14 days. No significant difference was found in the isolated abdominal trauma group. Laparoscopy is an emergent safe and effective technique for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes in selected stable abdominal penetrating or blunt trauma patients. However, these results need to be put in relation with the level of the centre and the expertise of the surgeon.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)503-512
Number of pages10
JournalUpdates in Surgery
Volume72
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2020

Keywords

  • Abdominal trauma
  • Acute care surgery
  • Blunt abdominal trauma
  • Diagnostic laparoscopy
  • Emergency laparoscopy
  • Hemodynamic stability
  • MI trauma surgeon
  • MIS
  • Minimally invasive trauma surgery
  • Penetrating abdominal trauma
  • Therapeutic laparoscopy
  • Trauma centre
  • Trauma laparoscopy
  • Trauma surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Is the minimally invasive trauma surgeon the next (r)evolution of trauma surgery? Indications and outcomes of diagnostic and therapeutic trauma laparoscopy in a level 1 trauma centre'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this