Is the Self-Report of Recent Cocaine or Methamphetamine Use Reliable in Illicit Stimulant Drug Users Who Present to the Emergency Department with Chest Pain?

Moon O. Lee, Patrick M. Vivier, Deborah B. Diercks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Use of illicit drugs results in an increased risk of morbidity and mortality, which is often seen in the Emergency Department (ED). Chest pain is frequently associated with cocaine and methamphetamine use. Objectives: To determine if the self-report of recent cocaine or methamphetamine use is reliable in illicit stimulant drug users who present to the ED with chest pain. Methods: A retrospective review of patients presenting to the ED from July 1, 2004 through June 30, 2006 was undertaken. Inclusion criteria were: age ≥ 18 years, chief complaint of chest pain, documented social history of drug abuse, positive urine toxicology screen and myoglobin and troponin levels measured, sent from the ED. Results: For the 318 patients who met the inclusion criteria, the self-report rate of cocaine or methamphetamine use was 51.8% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.46-0.57). No difference was found in the self-report rate between users of methamphetamine vs. cocaine (odds ratio [OR] 1.12, 95% CI 0.7-1.7). There also was no difference in the self-report rate by patient age < 50 years compared to patient age ≥ 50 years (OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.42-1.08). The self-report rate for males compared to females was not significantly different (OR 0.87, 95% CI 0.54-1.4). Patients who had a positive troponin were not significantly more likely to self-report drug use than patients who did not have a positive troponin (OR 1.1, 95% CI 0.55-2.2). Conclusion: The self-report rate among cocaine- or methamphetamine-using patients presenting to the ED with chest pain was 51.8%. There seems to be no significant difference in the self-report rate among those who use methamphetamine vs. those who use cocaine, nor by gender, nor stratified by age over 50 years.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)237-241
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Emergency Medicine
Volume37
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2009

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Methamphetamine
Street Drugs
Drug Users
Chest Pain
Cocaine
Self Report
Hospital Emergency Service
Troponin
Confidence Intervals
Odds Ratio
Myoglobin
Toxicology
Substance-Related Disorders
Urine
Morbidity
Mortality
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • chest pain
  • cocaine
  • drug use
  • methamphetamine
  • urine toxicology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

@article{d9362deec6004547870c3c2f5c76f954,
title = "Is the Self-Report of Recent Cocaine or Methamphetamine Use Reliable in Illicit Stimulant Drug Users Who Present to the Emergency Department with Chest Pain?",
abstract = "Background: Use of illicit drugs results in an increased risk of morbidity and mortality, which is often seen in the Emergency Department (ED). Chest pain is frequently associated with cocaine and methamphetamine use. Objectives: To determine if the self-report of recent cocaine or methamphetamine use is reliable in illicit stimulant drug users who present to the ED with chest pain. Methods: A retrospective review of patients presenting to the ED from July 1, 2004 through June 30, 2006 was undertaken. Inclusion criteria were: age ≥ 18 years, chief complaint of chest pain, documented social history of drug abuse, positive urine toxicology screen and myoglobin and troponin levels measured, sent from the ED. Results: For the 318 patients who met the inclusion criteria, the self-report rate of cocaine or methamphetamine use was 51.8{\%} (95{\%} confidence interval [CI] 0.46-0.57). No difference was found in the self-report rate between users of methamphetamine vs. cocaine (odds ratio [OR] 1.12, 95{\%} CI 0.7-1.7). There also was no difference in the self-report rate by patient age < 50 years compared to patient age ≥ 50 years (OR 0.67, 95{\%} CI 0.42-1.08). The self-report rate for males compared to females was not significantly different (OR 0.87, 95{\%} CI 0.54-1.4). Patients who had a positive troponin were not significantly more likely to self-report drug use than patients who did not have a positive troponin (OR 1.1, 95{\%} CI 0.55-2.2). Conclusion: The self-report rate among cocaine- or methamphetamine-using patients presenting to the ED with chest pain was 51.8{\%}. There seems to be no significant difference in the self-report rate among those who use methamphetamine vs. those who use cocaine, nor by gender, nor stratified by age over 50 years.",
keywords = "chest pain, cocaine, drug use, methamphetamine, urine toxicology",
author = "Lee, {Moon O.} and Vivier, {Patrick M.} and Diercks, {Deborah B.}",
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T1 - Is the Self-Report of Recent Cocaine or Methamphetamine Use Reliable in Illicit Stimulant Drug Users Who Present to the Emergency Department with Chest Pain?

AU - Lee, Moon O.

AU - Vivier, Patrick M.

AU - Diercks, Deborah B.

PY - 2009/8

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N2 - Background: Use of illicit drugs results in an increased risk of morbidity and mortality, which is often seen in the Emergency Department (ED). Chest pain is frequently associated with cocaine and methamphetamine use. Objectives: To determine if the self-report of recent cocaine or methamphetamine use is reliable in illicit stimulant drug users who present to the ED with chest pain. Methods: A retrospective review of patients presenting to the ED from July 1, 2004 through June 30, 2006 was undertaken. Inclusion criteria were: age ≥ 18 years, chief complaint of chest pain, documented social history of drug abuse, positive urine toxicology screen and myoglobin and troponin levels measured, sent from the ED. Results: For the 318 patients who met the inclusion criteria, the self-report rate of cocaine or methamphetamine use was 51.8% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.46-0.57). No difference was found in the self-report rate between users of methamphetamine vs. cocaine (odds ratio [OR] 1.12, 95% CI 0.7-1.7). There also was no difference in the self-report rate by patient age < 50 years compared to patient age ≥ 50 years (OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.42-1.08). The self-report rate for males compared to females was not significantly different (OR 0.87, 95% CI 0.54-1.4). Patients who had a positive troponin were not significantly more likely to self-report drug use than patients who did not have a positive troponin (OR 1.1, 95% CI 0.55-2.2). Conclusion: The self-report rate among cocaine- or methamphetamine-using patients presenting to the ED with chest pain was 51.8%. There seems to be no significant difference in the self-report rate among those who use methamphetamine vs. those who use cocaine, nor by gender, nor stratified by age over 50 years.

AB - Background: Use of illicit drugs results in an increased risk of morbidity and mortality, which is often seen in the Emergency Department (ED). Chest pain is frequently associated with cocaine and methamphetamine use. Objectives: To determine if the self-report of recent cocaine or methamphetamine use is reliable in illicit stimulant drug users who present to the ED with chest pain. Methods: A retrospective review of patients presenting to the ED from July 1, 2004 through June 30, 2006 was undertaken. Inclusion criteria were: age ≥ 18 years, chief complaint of chest pain, documented social history of drug abuse, positive urine toxicology screen and myoglobin and troponin levels measured, sent from the ED. Results: For the 318 patients who met the inclusion criteria, the self-report rate of cocaine or methamphetamine use was 51.8% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.46-0.57). No difference was found in the self-report rate between users of methamphetamine vs. cocaine (odds ratio [OR] 1.12, 95% CI 0.7-1.7). There also was no difference in the self-report rate by patient age < 50 years compared to patient age ≥ 50 years (OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.42-1.08). The self-report rate for males compared to females was not significantly different (OR 0.87, 95% CI 0.54-1.4). Patients who had a positive troponin were not significantly more likely to self-report drug use than patients who did not have a positive troponin (OR 1.1, 95% CI 0.55-2.2). Conclusion: The self-report rate among cocaine- or methamphetamine-using patients presenting to the ED with chest pain was 51.8%. There seems to be no significant difference in the self-report rate among those who use methamphetamine vs. those who use cocaine, nor by gender, nor stratified by age over 50 years.

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KW - drug use

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KW - urine toxicology

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