Is there a relationship between victim and partner alcohol use during an intimate partner violence event? Findings from an urban emergency department study of abused women

Sherry Lipsky, Raul Caetano, Craig A. Field, Gregory L. Larkin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This study sought to identify factors associated with drinking during an intimate partner violence (IPV) event among abused women presenting to an urban emergency department (ED). Methods: We use a cross-sectional study of IPV cases among adult female patients seen at an urban ED. Bivariate and logistic regression analyses were performed to identify substance use factors associated with an abused woman drinking while victimized or perpetrating IPV Results: Among the 182 cases, an increased number of drinks per week, consuming five or more drinks per occasion, alcohol abuse and dependence, and illicit drug use were significantly associated with the abused woman's drinking while victimized or perpetrating IPV Partner's drinking five or more drinks per occasion was associated only with the woman's drinking while victimized. Partners were more likely to drink while perpetrating IPV in the relationship whether or not the woman drank while victimized. Among couples in which the abused woman also perpetrated violence, the partner's drinking more closely paralleled the woman's drinking in events perpetrated by the woman. Independent risk factors associated with the abused woman drinking during victimization included number of drinks she consumed per week (adjusted odds ratio [adj. OR] = 1.31 for every five drinks) and her illicit drug use (adj. OR = 4.3). The odds of an abused woman drinking while perpetrating IPV increased 1.4 times for every five drinks she consumed per week. Conclusions: These findings suggest that alcohol-related behavior by both couples and individuals are important factors to consider in the relationship between IPV and alcohol use in this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)407-412
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Studies on Alcohol
Volume66
Issue number3
StatePublished - May 2005

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Battered Women
Drinking
Hospital Emergency Service
alcohol
Alcohols
violence
event
Street Drugs
Alcoholism
drug use
Odds Ratio
Intimate Partner Violence
Violence
Crime Victims
Logistics
cross-sectional study
victimization
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychology(all)

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Is there a relationship between victim and partner alcohol use during an intimate partner violence event? Findings from an urban emergency department study of abused women. / Lipsky, Sherry; Caetano, Raul; Field, Craig A.; Larkin, Gregory L.

In: Journal of Studies on Alcohol, Vol. 66, No. 3, 05.2005, p. 407-412.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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