“Is This Normal? Is This Not Normal? There Is No Set Example”: Sexual Health Intervention Preferences of LGBT Youth in Romantic Relationships

George J. Greene, Kimberly A. Fisher, Laura Kuper, Rebecca Andrews, Brian Mustanski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Limited research has examined the romantic relationships of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth despite evidence of relationship-oriented risks, including STI/HIV infection, unplanned pregnancy, and interpersonal violence. In efforts to inform future dyadic sexual health interventions for LGBT youth, this couple-based study aimed to identify the most salient sexual and relationship concerns of young same-sex couples and to assess their preferences for intervention content and format. Participants were a subset 36 young, racially and ethnically diverse, same-sex couples (N = 72 individuals) recruited from two ongoing longitudinal studies. Interviews were coded using a constant comparison method, and a process of inductive and deductive thematic analysis was used to interpret the data. The analysis yielded the following intervention themes: addressing sexual risk and protective behaviors, improving communication, coping with family and relationship violence, and identifying role models and sources of support. The couples reported a clear preference for small group interventions, and many recommended a mixed format approach for intervention delivery (i.e., including dyadic and online sessions). Additionally, recommendations for participant recruitment included a combination of Internet-based and social network referrals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalSexuality Research and Social Policy
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2015

Fingerprint

Transgender Persons
Reproductive Health
health
violence
communication behavior
Unplanned Pregnancy
role model
Domestic Violence
Family Relations
small group
pregnancy
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Risk-Taking
longitudinal study
social network
coping
Violence
Social Support
Internet
HIV Infections

Keywords

  • Couples
  • Health promotion
  • Health status disparities
  • HIV
  • Homosexuality
  • Qualitative research
  • Sexual health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gender Studies
  • Health(social science)
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

“Is This Normal? Is This Not Normal? There Is No Set Example” : Sexual Health Intervention Preferences of LGBT Youth in Romantic Relationships. / Greene, George J.; Fisher, Kimberly A.; Kuper, Laura; Andrews, Rebecca; Mustanski, Brian.

In: Sexuality Research and Social Policy, Vol. 12, No. 1, 01.03.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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