Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices Regarding Skin Cancer and Sun Exposure among Homeless Men at a Shelter in Dallas, TX

Adrienne Joseph, Tiffany B Kindratt, Patti Pagels, Nora E Gimpel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This cross-sectional study evaluated the knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding skin cancer and sun exposure among homeless men (n = 75). A 21-item survey was given to men residing at Calvert Place Men’s Shelter in Dallas, TX. Results indicated that 49% knew that a change in a mole’s appearance and a sore that does not heal were signs of skin cancer. Black homeless men were less likely to know that people with dark skin could get skin cancer and that sunscreen should be applied 15–30 min before sun exposure compared to white and other subgroups (p <.05). People were more likely to agree that sun protection is important (median = 5.0), but less likely to agree that they were at risk for skin cancer (median = 3.0). White men had higher levels of agreement that melanoma was dangerous compared to other racial/ethnic groups (p = 0.0224). Over half (52%) of individuals reported being in the sun often, yet only 21% reported the use of sunscreen. Most (71%) homeless men had never checked themselves for skin cancer and only 13% reported ever being screened by a health professional for skin cancer. Increased skin cancer education and increased screening efforts should be implemented to better protect the homeless population at Calvert Place from skin cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Cancer Education
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Skin Neoplasms
Solar System
Sunscreening Agents
Ethnic Groups
Melanoma
Cross-Sectional Studies
Education
Skin
Health

Keywords

  • Homeless
  • Skin neoplasms
  • Sun exposure
  • Underserved

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

@article{dec3017f97af450eae6c827b9e2b791a,
title = "Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices Regarding Skin Cancer and Sun Exposure among Homeless Men at a Shelter in Dallas, TX",
abstract = "This cross-sectional study evaluated the knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding skin cancer and sun exposure among homeless men (n = 75). A 21-item survey was given to men residing at Calvert Place Men’s Shelter in Dallas, TX. Results indicated that 49{\%} knew that a change in a mole’s appearance and a sore that does not heal were signs of skin cancer. Black homeless men were less likely to know that people with dark skin could get skin cancer and that sunscreen should be applied 15–30 min before sun exposure compared to white and other subgroups (p <.05). People were more likely to agree that sun protection is important (median = 5.0), but less likely to agree that they were at risk for skin cancer (median = 3.0). White men had higher levels of agreement that melanoma was dangerous compared to other racial/ethnic groups (p = 0.0224). Over half (52{\%}) of individuals reported being in the sun often, yet only 21{\%} reported the use of sunscreen. Most (71{\%}) homeless men had never checked themselves for skin cancer and only 13{\%} reported ever being screened by a health professional for skin cancer. Increased skin cancer education and increased screening efforts should be implemented to better protect the homeless population at Calvert Place from skin cancer.",
keywords = "Homeless, Skin neoplasms, Sun exposure, Underserved",
author = "Adrienne Joseph and Kindratt, {Tiffany B} and Patti Pagels and Gimpel, {Nora E}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s13187-019-01511-8",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Journal of Cancer Education",
issn = "0885-8195",
publisher = "Springer Publishing Company",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices Regarding Skin Cancer and Sun Exposure among Homeless Men at a Shelter in Dallas, TX

AU - Joseph, Adrienne

AU - Kindratt, Tiffany B

AU - Pagels, Patti

AU - Gimpel, Nora E

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - This cross-sectional study evaluated the knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding skin cancer and sun exposure among homeless men (n = 75). A 21-item survey was given to men residing at Calvert Place Men’s Shelter in Dallas, TX. Results indicated that 49% knew that a change in a mole’s appearance and a sore that does not heal were signs of skin cancer. Black homeless men were less likely to know that people with dark skin could get skin cancer and that sunscreen should be applied 15–30 min before sun exposure compared to white and other subgroups (p <.05). People were more likely to agree that sun protection is important (median = 5.0), but less likely to agree that they were at risk for skin cancer (median = 3.0). White men had higher levels of agreement that melanoma was dangerous compared to other racial/ethnic groups (p = 0.0224). Over half (52%) of individuals reported being in the sun often, yet only 21% reported the use of sunscreen. Most (71%) homeless men had never checked themselves for skin cancer and only 13% reported ever being screened by a health professional for skin cancer. Increased skin cancer education and increased screening efforts should be implemented to better protect the homeless population at Calvert Place from skin cancer.

AB - This cross-sectional study evaluated the knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding skin cancer and sun exposure among homeless men (n = 75). A 21-item survey was given to men residing at Calvert Place Men’s Shelter in Dallas, TX. Results indicated that 49% knew that a change in a mole’s appearance and a sore that does not heal were signs of skin cancer. Black homeless men were less likely to know that people with dark skin could get skin cancer and that sunscreen should be applied 15–30 min before sun exposure compared to white and other subgroups (p <.05). People were more likely to agree that sun protection is important (median = 5.0), but less likely to agree that they were at risk for skin cancer (median = 3.0). White men had higher levels of agreement that melanoma was dangerous compared to other racial/ethnic groups (p = 0.0224). Over half (52%) of individuals reported being in the sun often, yet only 21% reported the use of sunscreen. Most (71%) homeless men had never checked themselves for skin cancer and only 13% reported ever being screened by a health professional for skin cancer. Increased skin cancer education and increased screening efforts should be implemented to better protect the homeless population at Calvert Place from skin cancer.

KW - Homeless

KW - Skin neoplasms

KW - Sun exposure

KW - Underserved

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85063004784&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85063004784&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s13187-019-01511-8

DO - 10.1007/s13187-019-01511-8

M3 - Article

C2 - 30868481

AN - SCOPUS:85063004784

JO - Journal of Cancer Education

JF - Journal of Cancer Education

SN - 0885-8195

ER -