Ku affects the ataxia and rad 3-related/CHK1-dependent S phase checkpoint response after camptothecin treatment

Hongyan Wang, Xiang Wang, Xiang Yang Zhou, David J. Chen, Gloria C. Li, George Iliakis, Ya Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

38 Scopus citations

Abstract

Camptothecin (CPT) that targets DNA topoisomerase I is one of the most promising broad-spectrum anticancer drugs in development today. The cytotoxicity of CPT is S phase (S)-specific because the collision of advancing replication forks with CPT-topoisomerase I-DNA complexes results in DNA damage. After DNA damage, proliferating cells could actively slow down the DNA replication through an S checkpoint to provide time for repair. We report now that there is an activated S checkpoint response in CPT-treated mammalian cells. This response is regulated by Ataxia and Rad3-related (ATR)/CHK1 pathway. Compared with their wild-type counterparts, CPT-treated Ku80-/- cells showed stronger inhibition of DNA replication. This stronger inhibition had no relationship with DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity but correlated with the higher activities of ATR and the higher activities of CHK1 in such cells. Not only caffeine, the nonspecific inhibitor of ATR, or UCN-01, the nonspecific inhibitor of CHK1, but also the specific CHK1 antisense oligonucleotide abolished the stronger inhibition of DNA replication in CPT-treated Ku80-/- cells. These results in aggregate indicated that the stronger S checkpoint in CPT-treated Ku80-/- cells is regulated through the highly activated ATR/CHK1 pathway.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2483-2487
Number of pages5
JournalCancer research
Volume62
Issue number9
StatePublished - May 1 2002

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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