Lactation Support Services and Breastfeeding Initiation: Evidence from the Affordable Care Act

Kandice A. Kapinos, Lindsey Bullinger, Tami Gurley-Calvez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Despite substantial evidence of the benefits of breastfeeding for both mothers and children, rates of sustained breastfeeding in the United States are quite low. This study examined whether mandated coverage of lactation support services under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) affects breastfeeding behavior. Data Source: We studied the census of U.S. births included in the National Vital Statistics System from 2009 to 2014. Study Design: We used regression-adjusted difference-in-differences (DD) to examine changes in breastfeeding rates for privately insured mothers relative to those covered by Medicaid. We adjusted for several health and sociodemographic measures. We also examined the extent to which the effect varied across vulnerable populations—by race/ethnicity, maternal education, WIC status, and mode of delivery. Principal Findings: Results suggest that the ACA mandate increased the probability of breastfeeding initiation by 2.5 percentage points, which translates into about 47,000 more infants for whom breastfeeding was initiated in 2014. We find larger effects for black, less educated, and unmarried mothers. Conclusions: The Affordable Care Act–mandated coverage of lactation services increased breastfeeding initiation among privately insured mothers relative to mothers covered by Medicaid. The magnitude of the effect size varied with some evidence of certain groups being more likely to increase breastfeeding rates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2175-2196
Number of pages22
JournalHealth Services Research
Volume52
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act
Breast Feeding
Lactation
Mothers
Medicaid
Illegitimacy
Vital Statistics
Information Storage and Retrieval
Censuses
Parturition
Education

Keywords

  • Affordable Care Act
  • Breastfeeding

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

Cite this

Lactation Support Services and Breastfeeding Initiation : Evidence from the Affordable Care Act. / Kapinos, Kandice A.; Bullinger, Lindsey; Gurley-Calvez, Tami.

In: Health Services Research, Vol. 52, No. 6, 12.2017, p. 2175-2196.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kapinos, Kandice A. ; Bullinger, Lindsey ; Gurley-Calvez, Tami. / Lactation Support Services and Breastfeeding Initiation : Evidence from the Affordable Care Act. In: Health Services Research. 2017 ; Vol. 52, No. 6. pp. 2175-2196.
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