Lafora-like ground-glass inclusions in hepatocytes of pediatric patients

A report of two cases

Anne Marie O'Shea, Gregory J. Wilson, Simon C. Ling, Berge A. Minassian, Julie Turnbull, Ernest Cutz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We report 2 cases of ground-glass hepatocyte inclusions occurring in pediatric patients. Case 1 had alpha-thalassaemia major and was receiving iron chelation therapy, whereas case 2 had trisomy 21 with a history of bone marrow transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia. The liver sections in both cases showed eosinophilic, periodic acid-Schiff diastase - positive intracytoplasmic inclusions that were negative for hepatitis B surface antigen. Immunohistochemically the inclusions showed positive staining with KM279, a monoclonal antibody against polyglucosan derived from Lafora inclusions. On electron microscopy, in case 1, intracytoplasmic inclusions were composed of degenerate organelles, glycogen, and irregular fibrillar structures; in case 2, they were composed of vesicular structures containing granular material. Ultrastructural changes in both cases differed from classical Lafora inclusions and ruled out hepatitis B surface antigen, glycogenosis type IX and fibrinogen storage disease. Genetic analysis of the Lafora's disease genes performed in case 2 revealed no mutations. The development of hepatocyte cytoplasmic inclusions in both our cases could be related to medication effects, because similar inclusions were reported in patients using cyanamide. Drug-induced inclusions, mimicking Lafora's disease, should be included in the differential diagnosis of hepatocyte ground-glass inclusions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)351-357
Number of pages7
JournalPediatric and Developmental Pathology
Volume10
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2007

Fingerprint

Lafora Disease
Glass
Hepatocytes
Pediatrics
Hepatitis B Surface Antigens
Cyanamide
Chelation Therapy
Glycogen Storage Disease
alpha-Thalassemia
Periodic Acid
beta-Thalassemia
Inclusion Bodies
Amylases
Down Syndrome
Bone Marrow Transplantation
Glycogen
Acute Myeloid Leukemia
Organelles
Fibrinogen
Electron Microscopy

Keywords

  • Ground-glass inclusions
  • Lafora's disease
  • Liver
  • Medication
  • Pediatric

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Lafora-like ground-glass inclusions in hepatocytes of pediatric patients : A report of two cases. / O'Shea, Anne Marie; Wilson, Gregory J.; Ling, Simon C.; Minassian, Berge A.; Turnbull, Julie; Cutz, Ernest.

In: Pediatric and Developmental Pathology, Vol. 10, No. 5, 01.09.2007, p. 351-357.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

O'Shea, Anne Marie ; Wilson, Gregory J. ; Ling, Simon C. ; Minassian, Berge A. ; Turnbull, Julie ; Cutz, Ernest. / Lafora-like ground-glass inclusions in hepatocytes of pediatric patients : A report of two cases. In: Pediatric and Developmental Pathology. 2007 ; Vol. 10, No. 5. pp. 351-357.
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