Laparoscopic repair of penetrating splenic injury

Puya Davoodi, Cristina Budde, Christian T Minshall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Historically, all splenic injuries were treated with splenectomy. In recent decades, however, there has been a trend toward splenic conservation methods in an attempt to preserve immunologic functions. Although cases of splenic conservation in the setting of penetrating injuries exist in the literature, this method of management is more commonly attempted in blunt traumas. When presented with penetrating splenic trauma, surgeons generally still proceed directly to exploratory laparotomy with splenectomy. Splenic injuries are rarely repaired with splenorrhaphy due to surgeon inexperience and concern for reoperation. We conclude from this case that when presented with a penetrating splenic trauma in a hemodynamically stable patient, management by laparoscopic exploration with splenorrhaphy can be safe and effective.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)795-798
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Laparoendoscopic and Advanced Surgical Techniques
Volume19
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2009

Fingerprint

Wounds and Injuries
Splenectomy
Reoperation
Laparotomy
Surgeons

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Laparoscopic repair of penetrating splenic injury. / Davoodi, Puya; Budde, Cristina; Minshall, Christian T.

In: Journal of Laparoendoscopic and Advanced Surgical Techniques, Vol. 19, No. 6, 01.12.2009, p. 795-798.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{0419aa911a084f8b9b2c7fe32dfd7142,
title = "Laparoscopic repair of penetrating splenic injury",
abstract = "Historically, all splenic injuries were treated with splenectomy. In recent decades, however, there has been a trend toward splenic conservation methods in an attempt to preserve immunologic functions. Although cases of splenic conservation in the setting of penetrating injuries exist in the literature, this method of management is more commonly attempted in blunt traumas. When presented with penetrating splenic trauma, surgeons generally still proceed directly to exploratory laparotomy with splenectomy. Splenic injuries are rarely repaired with splenorrhaphy due to surgeon inexperience and concern for reoperation. We conclude from this case that when presented with a penetrating splenic trauma in a hemodynamically stable patient, management by laparoscopic exploration with splenorrhaphy can be safe and effective.",
author = "Puya Davoodi and Cristina Budde and Minshall, {Christian T}",
year = "2009",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1089/lap.2009.0174",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "19",
pages = "795--798",
journal = "Journal of Laparoendoscopic and Advanced Surgical Techniques",
issn = "1092-6429",
publisher = "Mary Ann Liebert Inc.",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Laparoscopic repair of penetrating splenic injury

AU - Davoodi, Puya

AU - Budde, Cristina

AU - Minshall, Christian T

PY - 2009/12/1

Y1 - 2009/12/1

N2 - Historically, all splenic injuries were treated with splenectomy. In recent decades, however, there has been a trend toward splenic conservation methods in an attempt to preserve immunologic functions. Although cases of splenic conservation in the setting of penetrating injuries exist in the literature, this method of management is more commonly attempted in blunt traumas. When presented with penetrating splenic trauma, surgeons generally still proceed directly to exploratory laparotomy with splenectomy. Splenic injuries are rarely repaired with splenorrhaphy due to surgeon inexperience and concern for reoperation. We conclude from this case that when presented with a penetrating splenic trauma in a hemodynamically stable patient, management by laparoscopic exploration with splenorrhaphy can be safe and effective.

AB - Historically, all splenic injuries were treated with splenectomy. In recent decades, however, there has been a trend toward splenic conservation methods in an attempt to preserve immunologic functions. Although cases of splenic conservation in the setting of penetrating injuries exist in the literature, this method of management is more commonly attempted in blunt traumas. When presented with penetrating splenic trauma, surgeons generally still proceed directly to exploratory laparotomy with splenectomy. Splenic injuries are rarely repaired with splenorrhaphy due to surgeon inexperience and concern for reoperation. We conclude from this case that when presented with a penetrating splenic trauma in a hemodynamically stable patient, management by laparoscopic exploration with splenorrhaphy can be safe and effective.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=72049121636&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=72049121636&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1089/lap.2009.0174

DO - 10.1089/lap.2009.0174

M3 - Article

VL - 19

SP - 795

EP - 798

JO - Journal of Laparoendoscopic and Advanced Surgical Techniques

JF - Journal of Laparoendoscopic and Advanced Surgical Techniques

SN - 1092-6429

IS - 6

ER -