Laparoscopic skills are improved with LapMentor™ training: Results of a randomized, double-blinded study

Pamela B. Andreatta, Derek T. Woodrum, John D. Birkmeyer, Rajani K. Yellamanchilli, Gerard M. Doherty, Paul G. Gauger, Rebecca M. Minter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

198 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine if prior training on the LapMentor™ laparoscopic simulator leads to improved performance of basic laparoscopic skills in the animate operating room environment. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Numerous influences have led to the development of computer-aided laparoscopic simulators: a need for greater efficiency in training, the unique and complex nature of laparoscopic surgery, and the increasing demand that surgeons demonstrate competence before proceeding to the operating room. The LapMentor™ simulator is expensive, however, and its use must be validated and justified prior to implementation into surgical training programs. METHODS: Nineteen surgical interns were randomized to training on the LapMentor™ laparoscopic simulator (n = 10) or to a control group (no simulator training, n = 9). Subjects randomized to the LapMentor™ trained to expert criterion levels 2 consecutive times on 6 designated basic skills modules. All subjects then completed a series of laparoscopic exercises in a live porcine model, and performance was assessed independently by 2 blinded reviewers. Time, accuracy rates, and global assessments of performance were recorded with an interrater reliability between reviewers of 0.99. RESULTS: LapMentor™ trained interns completed the 30° camera navigation exercise in significantly less time than control interns (166 ± 52 vs. 220 ± 39 seconds, P < 0.05); they also achieved higher accuracy rates in identifying the required objects with the laparoscope (96% ± 8% vs. 82% ± 15%, P < 0.05). Similarly, on the two-handed object transfer exercise, task completion time for LapMentor™ trained versus control interns was 130 ± 23 versus 184 ± 43 seconds (P < 0.01) with an accuracy rate of 98% ± 5% versus 80% ± 13% (P < 0.001). Additionally, LapMentor™ trained interns outperformed control subjects with regard to camera navigation skills, efficiency of motion, optimal instrument handling, perceptual ability, and performance of safe electrocautery. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that prior training on the LapMentor™ laparoscopic simulator leads to improved resident performance of basic skills in the animate operating room environment. This work marks the first prospective, randomized evaluation of the LapMentor™ simulator, and provides evidence that LapMentor™ training may lead to improved operating room performance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)854-860
Number of pages7
JournalAnnals of surgery
Volume243
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2006

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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    Andreatta, P. B., Woodrum, D. T., Birkmeyer, J. D., Yellamanchilli, R. K., Doherty, G. M., Gauger, P. G., & Minter, R. M. (2006). Laparoscopic skills are improved with LapMentor™ training: Results of a randomized, double-blinded study. Annals of surgery, 243(6), 854-860. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.sla.0000219641.79092.e5