Laparoscopic splenectomy as a definitive management option for high-grade traumatic splenic injury when non operative management is not feasible or failed: a 5-year experience from a level one trauma center with minimally invasive surgery expertise

TraumaLap Study Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Technique, indications and outcomes of laparoscopic splenectomy in stable trauma patients have not been well described yet. All hemodynamically non-compromised abdominal trauma patients who underwent splenectomy from 1/2013 to 12/2017 at our Level 1 trauma center were included. Demographic and clinical data were collected and analysed with per-protocol and an intention-to-treat comparison between open vs laparoscopic groups. 49 splenectomies were performed (16 laparoscopic, 33 open). Among the laparoscopic group, 81% were successfully completed laparoscopically. Laparoscopy was associated with a higher incidence of concomitant surgical procedures (p 0.016), longer operative times, but a significantly faster return of bowel function and oral diet without reoperations. No significant differences were demonstrated in morbidity, mortality, length of stay, or long-term complications, although laparoscopic had lower surgical site infection (0 vs 21%).The isolated splenic injury sub-analysis included 25 splenectomies,76% (19) open and 24% (6) laparoscopic and confirmed reduction in post-operative morbidity (40 vs 57%), blood transfusion (0 vs 48%), ICU admission (20 vs 57%) and overall LOS (7 vs 9 days) in the laparoscopic group. Laparoscopic splenectomy is a safe and effective technique for hemodynamically stable patients with splenic trauma and may represent an advantageous alternative to open splenectomy in terms of post-operative recovery and morbidity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalUpdates in Surgery
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • Abdominal trauma
  • Acute care surgery
  • Angio-embolization
  • Blunt abdominal trauma
  • Emergency laparoscopy
  • Hemodynamic stability
  • Laparoscopic splenectomy
  • Minimally invasive trauma surgery
  • Non-operative management
  • Penetrating abdominal trauma
  • Trauma center
  • Trauma laparoscopy
  • Trauma surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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