Late venous thromboembolism prophylaxis after craniotomy in acute traumatic brain injury

Mitchell J. Daley, Sadia Ali, Carlos V R Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The objective of this study is to compare rates of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients who receive enoxaparin prophylaxis compared with no enoxaparin prophylaxis after craniotomy for traumatic brain injury (TBI). This retrospective cohort evaluated all trauma patients admitted to a Level I trauma center from January 2006 to December 2011 who received craniotomy after acute TBI. Patients were excluded if developed VTE before administration of enoxaparin or they died within the first 72 hours of hospital admission. A total of 271 patients were included (enoxaparin prophylaxis, n = 45; no enoxaparin prophylaxis, n = 225). The median time until enoxaparin initiation was 11 ± 1 days. There was no significant difference in the proportion of patients who developed a VTE when using enoxaparin prophylaxis compared with no enoxaparin prophylaxis (2 vs 4%; P = 0.65). Rates of deep vein thrombosis (2 vs 3%; P = 0.87) and pulmonary embolism (0 vs 1%; P = 0.99) were similar between treatment groups, respectively. Late enoxaparin prophylaxis did not demonstrate a protective effect for VTE. Given the overall low event rate, the administration of pharmacologic prophylaxis against VTE late in the treatment course may not be routinely warranted after craniotomy for acute TBI. Further investigation with early administration of enoxaparin is needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)207-211
Number of pages5
JournalThe American surgeon
Volume81
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 1 2015

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Enoxaparin
Craniotomy
Venous Thromboembolism
Brain Injuries
Traumatic Brain Injury
Trauma Centers
Pulmonary Embolism
Venous Thrombosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Late venous thromboembolism prophylaxis after craniotomy in acute traumatic brain injury. / Daley, Mitchell J.; Ali, Sadia; Brown, Carlos V R.

In: The American surgeon, Vol. 81, No. 2, 01.02.2015, p. 207-211.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Daley, Mitchell J. ; Ali, Sadia ; Brown, Carlos V R. / Late venous thromboembolism prophylaxis after craniotomy in acute traumatic brain injury. In: The American surgeon. 2015 ; Vol. 81, No. 2. pp. 207-211.
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