Latent classes among recipients of a brief alcohol intervention: A replication analysis

Gerald Cochran, Craig Field, Carlo Diclemente, Raul Caetano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to identify differential improvement in alcohol use among injured patients following brief intervention. Latent class analysis was conducted to identify patient profiles based on alcohol-related risk from two clinical trials (Texas: N = 737; Maryland: N = 250) conducted in Level-1 trauma centers. Drinking was analyzed to detect improvements at 6 and 12 months. The four classes that emerged from Maryland participants were similar to four of the five classes from Texas. Increases in both studies for days abstinent were reported by classes characterized by multiple risks and minimal risks. Decreases in volume consumed for both studies were also reported by classes characterized by multiple risks and minimal risks. By classifying patients according to alcohol-related risk, providers may be able to build on positive prognoses for drinking improvements or adapt interventions to better serve those likely to improve less.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)29-38
Number of pages10
JournalBehavioral Medicine
Volume42
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2016

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Alcohols
Drinking
Trauma Centers
Clinical Trials

Keywords

  • at-risk alcohol use
  • injury
  • latent class analysis
  • screening and brief intervention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Latent classes among recipients of a brief alcohol intervention : A replication analysis. / Cochran, Gerald; Field, Craig; Diclemente, Carlo; Caetano, Raul.

In: Behavioral Medicine, Vol. 42, No. 1, 02.01.2016, p. 29-38.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cochran, Gerald ; Field, Craig ; Diclemente, Carlo ; Caetano, Raul. / Latent classes among recipients of a brief alcohol intervention : A replication analysis. In: Behavioral Medicine. 2016 ; Vol. 42, No. 1. pp. 29-38.
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