Lateralization on neuroimaging does not differentiate frontotemporal lobar degeneration from Alzheimer's disease

Anne M. Lipton, Raul Benavides, Linda S. Hynan, Frederick J. Bonte, Thomas S. Harris, Charles L. White, Eileen H. Bigio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Lateralization on neuroimaging was compared in cases of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD; n = 10) and cases of definite Alzheimer's disease (AD; n = 17). All of the cases were pathologically confirmed and semi-quantitative and statistical parametric mapping methods were employed. Seven of the 10 FTLD cases had lateralization on at least one neuroimaging modality: single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT), MRI, or CT. All 6/6 FTLD cases with SPECT showed lateralization. MRI results generally agreed with SPECT findings. Three of 4 FTLD cases had lateralized atrophy on CT. For the AD cases, 10/17 SPECTs, 2/7 MRIs, and 1/9 CTs showed lateralized findings. Of the neuroimaging modalities utilized, SPECT was the most sensitive in detecting lateralization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)324-327
Number of pages4
JournalDementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders
Volume17
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 15 2004

Keywords

  • Dementia
  • Frontotemporal dementia
  • Frontotemporal lobar degeneration
  • Single photon emission computerized tomography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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