Lesion contrast and detection using sonoelastographic shear velocity imaging

Preliminary results

Kenneth Hoyt, Kevin J. Parker

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper assesses lesion contrast and detection using sonoelastographic shear velocity imaging. Shear wave interference patterns, termed crawling waves, for a two phase medium were simulated assuming plane wave conditions. Shear velocity estimates were computed using a spatial autocorrelation algorithm that operates in the direction of shear wave propagation for a given kernel size. Contrast was determined by analyzing shear velocity estimate transition between mediums. Experimental results were obtained using heterogeneous phantoms with spherical inclusions (5 or 10 mm in diameter) characterized by elevated shear velocities. Two vibration sources were applied to opposing phantom edges and scanned (orthogonal to shear wave propagation) with an ultrasound scanner equipped for sonoelastography. Demodulated data was saved and transferred to an external computer for processing shear velocity images. Simulation results demonstrate shear velocity transition between contrasting mediums is governed by both estimator kernel size and source vibration frequency. Experimental results from phantoms further indicates that decreasing estimator kernel size produces corresponding decrease in shear velocity estimate transition between background and inclusion material albeit with an increase in estimator noise. Overall, results demonstrate the ability to generate high contrast shear velocity images using sonoelastographic techniques and detect millimeter-sized lesions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMedical Imaging 2007
Subtitle of host publicationUltrasonic Imaging and Signal Processing
Volume6513
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 15 2007
EventMedical Imaging 2007: Ultrasonic Imaging and Signal Processing - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: Feb 18 2007Feb 19 2007

Other

OtherMedical Imaging 2007: Ultrasonic Imaging and Signal Processing
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period2/18/072/19/07

Fingerprint

Imaging techniques
Shear waves
Wave propagation
Wave interference
Autocorrelation
Ultrasonics
Processing

Keywords

  • Crawling waves
  • Elasticity imaging
  • Shear velocity imaging
  • Sonoelastography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Hoyt, K., & Parker, K. J. (2007). Lesion contrast and detection using sonoelastographic shear velocity imaging: Preliminary results. In Medical Imaging 2007: Ultrasonic Imaging and Signal Processing (Vol. 6513). [65130L] https://doi.org/10.1117/12.709480

Lesion contrast and detection using sonoelastographic shear velocity imaging : Preliminary results. / Hoyt, Kenneth; Parker, Kevin J.

Medical Imaging 2007: Ultrasonic Imaging and Signal Processing. Vol. 6513 2007. 65130L.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Hoyt, K & Parker, KJ 2007, Lesion contrast and detection using sonoelastographic shear velocity imaging: Preliminary results. in Medical Imaging 2007: Ultrasonic Imaging and Signal Processing. vol. 6513, 65130L, Medical Imaging 2007: Ultrasonic Imaging and Signal Processing, San Diego, CA, United States, 2/18/07. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.709480
Hoyt K, Parker KJ. Lesion contrast and detection using sonoelastographic shear velocity imaging: Preliminary results. In Medical Imaging 2007: Ultrasonic Imaging and Signal Processing. Vol. 6513. 2007. 65130L https://doi.org/10.1117/12.709480
Hoyt, Kenneth ; Parker, Kevin J. / Lesion contrast and detection using sonoelastographic shear velocity imaging : Preliminary results. Medical Imaging 2007: Ultrasonic Imaging and Signal Processing. Vol. 6513 2007.
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