Limb apraxia without aphasia from a left sided lesion in a right handed patient

Ola A. Selnes, Alan Pestronk, John Hart, Barry Gordon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A right handed man had a massive left middle cerebral artery stroke. CT and MRI revealed extensive destruction of both anterior and posterior areas typically associated with language. There was, however, no aphasia, but instead a marked limb apraxia, dyscalculia, dense right visual neglect, and anosognosia. These uncommon dissociations and associations support the hypothesis that cerebral control of motor function of the limbs is not fundamentally related to the motor control involved in speech, and the notion that handedness is related to laterality of motor control, and only accidentally to laterality of language control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)734-737
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry
Volume54
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 1991

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Apraxias
Functional Laterality
Aphasia
Patient Rights
Language
Dyscalculia
Extremities
Dissociative Disorders
Agnosia
Middle Cerebral Artery Infarction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Cite this

Limb apraxia without aphasia from a left sided lesion in a right handed patient. / Selnes, Ola A.; Pestronk, Alan; Hart, John; Gordon, Barry.

In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, Vol. 54, No. 8, 1991, p. 734-737.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Selnes, Ola A. ; Pestronk, Alan ; Hart, John ; Gordon, Barry. / Limb apraxia without aphasia from a left sided lesion in a right handed patient. In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry. 1991 ; Vol. 54, No. 8. pp. 734-737.
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