Lipoprotein (a) levels in diabetes mellitus

Relationship to metabolic control

Luis C. Ramirez, Carlos Arauz-Pacheco, Carolin Lackner, George Albright, Beverly V. Adams, Philip Raskin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

98 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine the influence of diabetes control on serum lipoprotein (a) concentrations. ■ Setting: Diabetes clinic of a large metropolitan public hospital, with primary- and secondary-care patients. Design: A cross-sectional study. Comparisons of lipoprotein (a) concentrations were made between a normal control group, a group of diabetic patients with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) less than 8.0%, and a group of diabetic patients with HbA1c of 8.0% or higher. Patients: Ninety-five normal controls and 93 diabetic subjects (49 with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and 44 with noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus). Results: Sixty diabetic subjects with HbA1c levels of 8.0% or higher had higher (25 mg/dL) median levels of lipoprotein (a) when compared with either 93 normal controls (8.8 mg/dL) or 33 diabetic patients with HbA1c less than 8.0% (7.5 mg/dL) (P = 0.008 and P = 0.012, respectively). A similar pattern of distribution of lipoprotein (a) levels according to degree of metabolic control was seen in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. No difference in the lipoprotein (a) distribution was noted between diabetic men and women. No correlation was observed between lipoprotein (a) levels and total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride levels. Conclusion: Lipoprotein (a) levels are elevated in poorly controlled diabetic patients. Increased levels of lipoprotein (a) may be a contributing factor to the high risk for atherosclerosis observed in diabetic patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)42-47
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of Internal Medicine
Volume117
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jul 1 1992

Fingerprint

Lipoprotein(a)
Diabetes Mellitus
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Secondary Care
Public Hospitals
Urban Hospitals
Glycosylated Hemoglobin A
LDL Cholesterol
Primary Health Care
Atherosclerosis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Cholesterol
Control Groups
Serum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Lipoprotein (a) levels in diabetes mellitus : Relationship to metabolic control. / Ramirez, Luis C.; Arauz-Pacheco, Carlos; Lackner, Carolin; Albright, George; Adams, Beverly V.; Raskin, Philip.

In: Annals of Internal Medicine, Vol. 117, No. 1, 01.07.1992, p. 42-47.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ramirez, LC, Arauz-Pacheco, C, Lackner, C, Albright, G, Adams, BV & Raskin, P 1992, 'Lipoprotein (a) levels in diabetes mellitus: Relationship to metabolic control', Annals of Internal Medicine, vol. 117, no. 1, pp. 42-47.
Ramirez, Luis C. ; Arauz-Pacheco, Carlos ; Lackner, Carolin ; Albright, George ; Adams, Beverly V. ; Raskin, Philip. / Lipoprotein (a) levels in diabetes mellitus : Relationship to metabolic control. In: Annals of Internal Medicine. 1992 ; Vol. 117, No. 1. pp. 42-47.
@article{d6cbdc04d176457ead8ca9d4b44516c2,
title = "Lipoprotein (a) levels in diabetes mellitus: Relationship to metabolic control",
abstract = "Objective: To determine the influence of diabetes control on serum lipoprotein (a) concentrations. ■ Setting: Diabetes clinic of a large metropolitan public hospital, with primary- and secondary-care patients. Design: A cross-sectional study. Comparisons of lipoprotein (a) concentrations were made between a normal control group, a group of diabetic patients with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) less than 8.0{\%}, and a group of diabetic patients with HbA1c of 8.0{\%} or higher. Patients: Ninety-five normal controls and 93 diabetic subjects (49 with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and 44 with noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus). Results: Sixty diabetic subjects with HbA1c levels of 8.0{\%} or higher had higher (25 mg/dL) median levels of lipoprotein (a) when compared with either 93 normal controls (8.8 mg/dL) or 33 diabetic patients with HbA1c less than 8.0{\%} (7.5 mg/dL) (P = 0.008 and P = 0.012, respectively). A similar pattern of distribution of lipoprotein (a) levels according to degree of metabolic control was seen in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. No difference in the lipoprotein (a) distribution was noted between diabetic men and women. No correlation was observed between lipoprotein (a) levels and total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride levels. Conclusion: Lipoprotein (a) levels are elevated in poorly controlled diabetic patients. Increased levels of lipoprotein (a) may be a contributing factor to the high risk for atherosclerosis observed in diabetic patients.",
author = "Ramirez, {Luis C.} and Carlos Arauz-Pacheco and Carolin Lackner and George Albright and Adams, {Beverly V.} and Philip Raskin",
year = "1992",
month = "7",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "117",
pages = "42--47",
journal = "Annals of Internal Medicine",
issn = "0003-4819",
publisher = "American College of Physicians",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Lipoprotein (a) levels in diabetes mellitus

T2 - Relationship to metabolic control

AU - Ramirez, Luis C.

AU - Arauz-Pacheco, Carlos

AU - Lackner, Carolin

AU - Albright, George

AU - Adams, Beverly V.

AU - Raskin, Philip

PY - 1992/7/1

Y1 - 1992/7/1

N2 - Objective: To determine the influence of diabetes control on serum lipoprotein (a) concentrations. ■ Setting: Diabetes clinic of a large metropolitan public hospital, with primary- and secondary-care patients. Design: A cross-sectional study. Comparisons of lipoprotein (a) concentrations were made between a normal control group, a group of diabetic patients with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) less than 8.0%, and a group of diabetic patients with HbA1c of 8.0% or higher. Patients: Ninety-five normal controls and 93 diabetic subjects (49 with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and 44 with noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus). Results: Sixty diabetic subjects with HbA1c levels of 8.0% or higher had higher (25 mg/dL) median levels of lipoprotein (a) when compared with either 93 normal controls (8.8 mg/dL) or 33 diabetic patients with HbA1c less than 8.0% (7.5 mg/dL) (P = 0.008 and P = 0.012, respectively). A similar pattern of distribution of lipoprotein (a) levels according to degree of metabolic control was seen in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. No difference in the lipoprotein (a) distribution was noted between diabetic men and women. No correlation was observed between lipoprotein (a) levels and total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride levels. Conclusion: Lipoprotein (a) levels are elevated in poorly controlled diabetic patients. Increased levels of lipoprotein (a) may be a contributing factor to the high risk for atherosclerosis observed in diabetic patients.

AB - Objective: To determine the influence of diabetes control on serum lipoprotein (a) concentrations. ■ Setting: Diabetes clinic of a large metropolitan public hospital, with primary- and secondary-care patients. Design: A cross-sectional study. Comparisons of lipoprotein (a) concentrations were made between a normal control group, a group of diabetic patients with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) less than 8.0%, and a group of diabetic patients with HbA1c of 8.0% or higher. Patients: Ninety-five normal controls and 93 diabetic subjects (49 with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and 44 with noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus). Results: Sixty diabetic subjects with HbA1c levels of 8.0% or higher had higher (25 mg/dL) median levels of lipoprotein (a) when compared with either 93 normal controls (8.8 mg/dL) or 33 diabetic patients with HbA1c less than 8.0% (7.5 mg/dL) (P = 0.008 and P = 0.012, respectively). A similar pattern of distribution of lipoprotein (a) levels according to degree of metabolic control was seen in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. No difference in the lipoprotein (a) distribution was noted between diabetic men and women. No correlation was observed between lipoprotein (a) levels and total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride levels. Conclusion: Lipoprotein (a) levels are elevated in poorly controlled diabetic patients. Increased levels of lipoprotein (a) may be a contributing factor to the high risk for atherosclerosis observed in diabetic patients.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0026688846&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0026688846&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 117

SP - 42

EP - 47

JO - Annals of Internal Medicine

JF - Annals of Internal Medicine

SN - 0003-4819

IS - 1

ER -