Lipoprotein-cholesterol responses in healthy infants fed defined diets from ages 1 to 12 months: Comparison of diets predominant in oleic acid versus linoleic acid, with parallel observations in infants fed a human milk- based diet

C. E. Mize, R. Uauy, R. Kramer, M. Benser, S. Allen, Scott M Grundy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

A prospective study in healthy infants predefining both diet fatty acid and cholesterol, from birth to age 1 year, compared response of cholesterol fractions in three groups: random assignment to 1) monosaturated-(Hi-Mono) (n = 20), or 2) polyunsaturated-(Hi-Poly) (n = 22) fatty acid-enriched diets, or 3) non-randomized selection to breast feeding (Human Milk) (n = 25). In each group, designated weaning foods and supplements maintained fatty acid anti cholesterol intake similar to that of each group's defined formulas, with long-term compliance confirmed by plasma phospholipid fatty acid concentrations. By 12 months, total cholesterol was significantly lower in the Hi-Poly group compared to either of the other groups (P < 0.05). Low density lipoprotein (LDL)- and high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol concentrations were significantly lower by 12 months in the Hi-Poly group, compared to the Hi-Mono groups. However, at the earlier 4-month interval, total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol in both Hi-Mono and Hi-Poly groups were not different from each other, although each was significantly lower than the parallel Human Milk-group (P < 0.05). The Hi-Mono group increased gradually in total and LDL-cholesterol such that, after 12 months' feedings, all lipid fractions of this Hi-Mono group were no different from those of the Human Milk group. In independent group comparisons, there were no significant differences in HDL-cholesterol concentrations after 4 and 9 months on these diets. Independent of diet, HDL-cholesterol showed a falling trend as an overall time-effect across all groups (P < 0.001). These data suggest that prolonged feeding of a diet enriched in polyunsaturated acid in early infancy has a significant cholesterol-lowering effect compared to monounsaturates. These differences in total, LDL-, and HDL-cholesterol plasma concentrations between polyunsaturates and monounsaturates were not significantly evident until feedings had continued for a year.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1178-1187
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of lipid research
Volume36
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1995

Keywords

  • breast feeding
  • dietary cholesterol
  • dietary vegetable oil
  • infant feeding
  • infant food
  • mono-unsaturated fatty acids
  • plasma lipoproteins
  • polyunsaturated fatty acids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology
  • Cell Biology

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