Long-Term Effect of Exposure to a Friend's Adolescent Childbirth on Fertility, Education, and Earnings

Kandice A. Kapinos, Olga Yakusheva

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose To examine the long-term effect of a female adolescent's exposure to a peer's childbirth on fertility, schooling, and earnings. Methods Estimating causal peer effects in fertility is challenging because the exposure variable (peer pregnancy and childbirth) is nonrandomly assigned. Miscarriages in early pregnancy occur spontaneously in a significant proportion of pregnancies and, therefore, create a natural experiment within which the causal effect of childbirth can be examined. This exploratory study compared adjusted fertility, educational, and labor market outcomes of female adolescents whose adolescent pregnant friend gave birth to female adolescents whose pregnant friend miscarried. Longitudinal data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health were analyzed using logistic, ordinal logistic, linear, and log-linear regressions. Results Females whose adolescent pregnant friends gave birth (instead of miscarried) had decreased adolescent sexual activity, pregnancy, and teen childbearing and increased educational attainment, but there were no significant long-term effects on total fertility or differences in labor market outcomes, relative to females whose pregnant adolescent friend miscarried. Conclusions Adolescent females appear to learn vicariously from teen childbearing experiences of their friends, resulting in delayed childbearing and higher educational attainment. Interventions that expose adolescents to the reality of teen motherhood may be an effective way of reducing the rates of teen childbearing and improving schooling.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)311-317.e2
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
Volume59
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Fertility
Parturition
Education
Pregnancy
National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health
Reproductive Behavior
Pregnancy in Adolescence
Spontaneous Abortion
Sexual Behavior
Linear Models

Keywords

  • Miscarriage
  • Pregnancy
  • Teen fertility

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Long-Term Effect of Exposure to a Friend's Adolescent Childbirth on Fertility, Education, and Earnings. / Kapinos, Kandice A.; Yakusheva, Olga.

In: Journal of Adolescent Health, Vol. 59, No. 3, 01.09.2016, p. 311-317.e2.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{53da2785cb884be68612d57fc1e437c0,
title = "Long-Term Effect of Exposure to a Friend's Adolescent Childbirth on Fertility, Education, and Earnings",
abstract = "Purpose To examine the long-term effect of a female adolescent's exposure to a peer's childbirth on fertility, schooling, and earnings. Methods Estimating causal peer effects in fertility is challenging because the exposure variable (peer pregnancy and childbirth) is nonrandomly assigned. Miscarriages in early pregnancy occur spontaneously in a significant proportion of pregnancies and, therefore, create a natural experiment within which the causal effect of childbirth can be examined. This exploratory study compared adjusted fertility, educational, and labor market outcomes of female adolescents whose adolescent pregnant friend gave birth to female adolescents whose pregnant friend miscarried. Longitudinal data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health were analyzed using logistic, ordinal logistic, linear, and log-linear regressions. Results Females whose adolescent pregnant friends gave birth (instead of miscarried) had decreased adolescent sexual activity, pregnancy, and teen childbearing and increased educational attainment, but there were no significant long-term effects on total fertility or differences in labor market outcomes, relative to females whose pregnant adolescent friend miscarried. Conclusions Adolescent females appear to learn vicariously from teen childbearing experiences of their friends, resulting in delayed childbearing and higher educational attainment. Interventions that expose adolescents to the reality of teen motherhood may be an effective way of reducing the rates of teen childbearing and improving schooling.",
keywords = "Miscarriage, Pregnancy, Teen fertility",
author = "Kapinos, {Kandice A.} and Olga Yakusheva",
year = "2016",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jadohealth.2016.05.003",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "59",
pages = "311--317.e2",
journal = "Journal of Adolescent Health",
issn = "1054-139X",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Long-Term Effect of Exposure to a Friend's Adolescent Childbirth on Fertility, Education, and Earnings

AU - Kapinos, Kandice A.

AU - Yakusheva, Olga

PY - 2016/9/1

Y1 - 2016/9/1

N2 - Purpose To examine the long-term effect of a female adolescent's exposure to a peer's childbirth on fertility, schooling, and earnings. Methods Estimating causal peer effects in fertility is challenging because the exposure variable (peer pregnancy and childbirth) is nonrandomly assigned. Miscarriages in early pregnancy occur spontaneously in a significant proportion of pregnancies and, therefore, create a natural experiment within which the causal effect of childbirth can be examined. This exploratory study compared adjusted fertility, educational, and labor market outcomes of female adolescents whose adolescent pregnant friend gave birth to female adolescents whose pregnant friend miscarried. Longitudinal data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health were analyzed using logistic, ordinal logistic, linear, and log-linear regressions. Results Females whose adolescent pregnant friends gave birth (instead of miscarried) had decreased adolescent sexual activity, pregnancy, and teen childbearing and increased educational attainment, but there were no significant long-term effects on total fertility or differences in labor market outcomes, relative to females whose pregnant adolescent friend miscarried. Conclusions Adolescent females appear to learn vicariously from teen childbearing experiences of their friends, resulting in delayed childbearing and higher educational attainment. Interventions that expose adolescents to the reality of teen motherhood may be an effective way of reducing the rates of teen childbearing and improving schooling.

AB - Purpose To examine the long-term effect of a female adolescent's exposure to a peer's childbirth on fertility, schooling, and earnings. Methods Estimating causal peer effects in fertility is challenging because the exposure variable (peer pregnancy and childbirth) is nonrandomly assigned. Miscarriages in early pregnancy occur spontaneously in a significant proportion of pregnancies and, therefore, create a natural experiment within which the causal effect of childbirth can be examined. This exploratory study compared adjusted fertility, educational, and labor market outcomes of female adolescents whose adolescent pregnant friend gave birth to female adolescents whose pregnant friend miscarried. Longitudinal data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health were analyzed using logistic, ordinal logistic, linear, and log-linear regressions. Results Females whose adolescent pregnant friends gave birth (instead of miscarried) had decreased adolescent sexual activity, pregnancy, and teen childbearing and increased educational attainment, but there were no significant long-term effects on total fertility or differences in labor market outcomes, relative to females whose pregnant adolescent friend miscarried. Conclusions Adolescent females appear to learn vicariously from teen childbearing experiences of their friends, resulting in delayed childbearing and higher educational attainment. Interventions that expose adolescents to the reality of teen motherhood may be an effective way of reducing the rates of teen childbearing and improving schooling.

KW - Miscarriage

KW - Pregnancy

KW - Teen fertility

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84995554284&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84995554284&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2016.05.003

DO - 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2016.05.003

M3 - Article

C2 - 27320033

AN - SCOPUS:84995554284

VL - 59

SP - 311-317.e2

JO - Journal of Adolescent Health

JF - Journal of Adolescent Health

SN - 1054-139X

IS - 3

ER -