Long-term mortality in hypertensive patients with coronary artery disease: Results from the US cohort of the international verapamil (SR)/trandolapril study

Islam Y. Elgendy, Anthony A. Bavry, Yan Gong, Eileen M. Handberg, Rhonda M. Cooper-Dehoff, Carl J. Pepine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

The dyad of hypertension and coronary artery disease is prevalent; however, data on systolic blood pressure (SBP) control and long-term all-cause mortality are lacking. Using extended follow-up data from the US cohort of the International Verapamil (SR)/Trandolapril Study (mean 11.6 years), subjects were categorized by age at enrollment (50 to <60 and ≥60 years). Cox proportional adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were constructed for time to all-cause mortality according to achieved mean SBP. In those 50 to <60 years and using a referent SBP of <130 mm Hg, an achieved SBP of 130 to 140 mm Hg was associated with a similar risk of mortality (HR, 1.03; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.87-1.23), whereas an achieved SBP of ≥140 mm Hg was associated with an increased risk of mortality (HR, 1.80; 95% CI, 1.53-2.11). Among subjects aged ≥60 years and using a referent SBP of <130 mm Hg, an achieved SBP 130 to 140 mm Hg was associated with a lower mortality risk (HR, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.85-0.98). There was an increased risk of mortality with an achieved SBP ≥150 mm Hg (HR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.23-1.45), but not with an achieved SBP 140 to 150 mm Hg (HR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.94-1.11). In hypertensive patients with coronary artery disease, achieving a SBP of 130 to 140 mm Hg seems to be associated with lower all-cause mortality after ≈11.6 years of follow-up.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1110-1114
Number of pages5
JournalHypertension
Volume68
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • adult
  • blood pressure
  • coronary artery disease
  • hypertension
  • mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

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