Long-term rates of PCO following small incision foldable acrylic intraocular lens implantation in children

David R. Stager, David R. Weakley, Jeffrey S. Hunter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the long-term incidence of postoperative posterior capsular opacification (PCO) in children undergoing small incision foldable acrylic lens implantation with at least 2 years of follow up. Methods: In 18 children, 26 eyes underwent small incision cataract extraction with posterior chamber foldable acrylic lens implantation. The posterior capsule was left intact in all patients at the time of surgery. Results: With a mean follow up of 2.75 years and a mean age at surgery of 8.25 years, 13 of 26 eyes (50%) developed visually significant PCO requiring intervention. In the group of children under 4 years of age, 5 of 5 eyes (100%) developed visually significant PCO, while 8 of 21 eyes (38%) in the group of children over 4 years of age developed opacification. Four of 26 eyes (15%) required two procedures (either repeat Nd:YAG laser capsulotomy or pars plana secondary membrane removal) to clear the visual axis. Conclusion: In this study, the incidence of PCO following small incision acrylic lens implantation in children over 4 years of age is lower than those rates reported by conventional large incision rigid lens techniques with a minimum of 2 years follow up. This technique has advantages over conventional techniques in older children because it offers less surgical intervention, a lower cost to patients, and less risk of vitreous and retinal complications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)73-76
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus
Volume39
Issue number2
StatePublished - 2002

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Intraocular Lens Implantation
Lenses
Temazepam
Cataract Extraction
Solid-State Lasers
Capsules
Cohort Studies
Costs and Cost Analysis
Membranes
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Long-term rates of PCO following small incision foldable acrylic intraocular lens implantation in children. / Stager, David R.; Weakley, David R.; Hunter, Jeffrey S.

In: Journal of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus, Vol. 39, No. 2, 2002, p. 73-76.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Purpose: To evaluate the long-term incidence of postoperative posterior capsular opacification (PCO) in children undergoing small incision foldable acrylic lens implantation with at least 2 years of follow up. Methods: In 18 children, 26 eyes underwent small incision cataract extraction with posterior chamber foldable acrylic lens implantation. The posterior capsule was left intact in all patients at the time of surgery. Results: With a mean follow up of 2.75 years and a mean age at surgery of 8.25 years, 13 of 26 eyes (50{\%}) developed visually significant PCO requiring intervention. In the group of children under 4 years of age, 5 of 5 eyes (100{\%}) developed visually significant PCO, while 8 of 21 eyes (38{\%}) in the group of children over 4 years of age developed opacification. Four of 26 eyes (15{\%}) required two procedures (either repeat Nd:YAG laser capsulotomy or pars plana secondary membrane removal) to clear the visual axis. Conclusion: In this study, the incidence of PCO following small incision acrylic lens implantation in children over 4 years of age is lower than those rates reported by conventional large incision rigid lens techniques with a minimum of 2 years follow up. This technique has advantages over conventional techniques in older children because it offers less surgical intervention, a lower cost to patients, and less risk of vitreous and retinal complications.",
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