Long-term survival after aortic valve replacement among high-risk elderly patients in the United States: Insights from the society of thoracic surgeons adult cardiac surgery database, 1991 to 2007

J. Matthew Brennan, Fred H. Edwards, Yue Zhao, Sean M. O'Brien, Pamela S. Douglas, Eric D. Peterson

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Background-: Surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) remains the standard of care for the treatment of operable, symptomatic aortic valve disease; however, to date, there are limited national data on the contemporary long-term outcomes after AVR in older individuals. Methods and Results-: We examined long-term survival among 145 911 AVR patients ≥65 years of age undergoing AVR at 1026 centers with participation in the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database from 1991 to 2007. In-hospital complications and long-term survival were stratified by age, Society of Thoracic Surgeons perioperative risk of mortality, and several comorbidities. The median patient age was 76 years; 16% had chronic lung disease, 6% had preoperative renal failure, 38% had heart failure, and 12% had prior cardiac surgery. The median survival in patients 65 to 69, 70 to 79, and ≥80 years of age undergoing isolated AVR was 13, 9, and 6 years, respectively. For AVR plus coronary artery bypass graft procedures, median survival was 10, 8, and 6 years, respectively. Although only 5% of isolated AVR patients had a high Society of Thoracic Surgeons perioperative risk of mortality (≥10%), their median survival was 2.5 to 2.7 years. Severe lung disease and renal failure were each associated with a ≥50% reduction in median survival among all age groups compared with those who did not have these comorbidities, whereas left ventricular dysfunction and prior cardiac operation were associated with a 25% reduction in median survival. Conclusion-: Long-term survival after surgical AVR in the elderly is excellent, although patients with a high Society of Thoracic Surgeons perioperative risk of mortality and those with certain comorbidities carry a particularly poor long-term prognosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1621-1629
Number of pages9
JournalCirculation
Volume126
Issue number13
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 25 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • aged
  • aortic valve
  • outcome assessment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Physiology (medical)

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