Long-term T cell responses in the brain after an ischemic stroke

Uma Maheswari Selvaraj, Ann M. Stowe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Stroke, which occurs during a loss of blood flow to the brain, is a global disease that accounts for 10% of yearly mortality. But stroke is also a leading cause of long-term adult disability, with recovery continuing for months to years after initial stroke onset. This long-term functional recovery from stroke encompasses changes in neuronal structure and function, and occurs throughout the post-stroke brain. Much less understood is whether the adaptive immune cells that infiltrated the brain during acute post-stroke neuroinflammation remain long-term, and if their presence supports or hinders functional recovery. Studies show that T cell subsets and their derived cytokines exhibit diverse protective and detrimental effects in the immediate acute phase following stroke. Interestingly, T cells are also important in regulating physiological behavior, which hints at a potential role in functional recovery after stroke. Moreover, T cell egress into the post-stroke brain might actually peak weeks after stroke onset, suggesting a long-term role for the adaptive immune system in the injured CNS. However, the significance of T cells in the long-term functional and behavioral recovery and repair phase of stroke remains largely unexplored. We summarize here recent work in delineating the beneficial and detrimental effects of T cells after a stroke, including antigen-specific and non-specific effects of T cells in the post-stroke recovery phase. We also highlight the role of T cells in other CNS diseases that may suggest mechanisms for future study of these adaptive immune cells in the ischemic brain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)323-333
Number of pages11
JournalDiscovery medicine
Volume24
Issue number134
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

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Stroke
T-Lymphocytes
Brain
Central Nervous System Diseases
T-Lymphocyte Subsets
Immune System
Cytokines
Antigens
Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Selvaraj, U. M., & Stowe, A. M. (2017). Long-term T cell responses in the brain after an ischemic stroke. Discovery medicine, 24(134), 323-333.

Long-term T cell responses in the brain after an ischemic stroke. / Selvaraj, Uma Maheswari; Stowe, Ann M.

In: Discovery medicine, Vol. 24, No. 134, 01.01.2017, p. 323-333.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Selvaraj, UM & Stowe, AM 2017, 'Long-term T cell responses in the brain after an ischemic stroke', Discovery medicine, vol. 24, no. 134, pp. 323-333.
Selvaraj, Uma Maheswari ; Stowe, Ann M. / Long-term T cell responses in the brain after an ischemic stroke. In: Discovery medicine. 2017 ; Vol. 24, No. 134. pp. 323-333.
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