Low-dose combination therapy

The rationalization for an ACE inhibitor and a calcium channel blocker in higher risk patients

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16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As more high-risk hypertensives are treated and the need for more intensive antihypertensive therapy is recognized, combination therapies are increasingly used. For initial therapy, particularly for relatively low-risk patients, low-dose combinations are often appropriate. For those who require additional therapy, higher doses of combinations may provide further efficacy while minimizing dose-dependent side effects of monotherapy, thereby improving adherence to therapy. Those combination agents should provide 24-h control with one daily dose, thereby ensuring protection in the early morning hours. Combining an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor and a calcium channel blocker is a rational approach to treating hypertension. Not only does it provide significantly better blood pressure control than individual components used as monotherapy, it also minimizes dose-dependent side effects. Also, combining agents from different classes results in complementary mechanisms of action that provide other cardiovascular protective benefits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Hypertension
Volume14
Issue number5 II
StatePublished - 2001

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Calcium Channel Blockers
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors
Therapeutics
Antihypertensive Agents
Blood Pressure
Hypertension

Keywords

  • Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors
  • Antihypertension therapy
  • Calcium channel blockers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

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abstract = "As more high-risk hypertensives are treated and the need for more intensive antihypertensive therapy is recognized, combination therapies are increasingly used. For initial therapy, particularly for relatively low-risk patients, low-dose combinations are often appropriate. For those who require additional therapy, higher doses of combinations may provide further efficacy while minimizing dose-dependent side effects of monotherapy, thereby improving adherence to therapy. Those combination agents should provide 24-h control with one daily dose, thereby ensuring protection in the early morning hours. Combining an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor and a calcium channel blocker is a rational approach to treating hypertension. Not only does it provide significantly better blood pressure control than individual components used as monotherapy, it also minimizes dose-dependent side effects. Also, combining agents from different classes results in complementary mechanisms of action that provide other cardiovascular protective benefits.",
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AB - As more high-risk hypertensives are treated and the need for more intensive antihypertensive therapy is recognized, combination therapies are increasingly used. For initial therapy, particularly for relatively low-risk patients, low-dose combinations are often appropriate. For those who require additional therapy, higher doses of combinations may provide further efficacy while minimizing dose-dependent side effects of monotherapy, thereby improving adherence to therapy. Those combination agents should provide 24-h control with one daily dose, thereby ensuring protection in the early morning hours. Combining an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor and a calcium channel blocker is a rational approach to treating hypertension. Not only does it provide significantly better blood pressure control than individual components used as monotherapy, it also minimizes dose-dependent side effects. Also, combining agents from different classes results in complementary mechanisms of action that provide other cardiovascular protective benefits.

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