Low prevalence of pertussis among children admitted with respiratory symptoms during respiratory syncytial virus season

George K. Siberry, Nicholas R. Paquette, Tracy L. Ross, Trish M. Perl, Alexandra Valsamakis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pertussis may go unrecognized during respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) epidemics. Nosocomially transmitted pertussis can be severe in infants. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) screening may identify infants with pertussis on admission, allowing for preemptive isolation. In a random sample, 1 (0.6%) of 166 children admitted to the hospital during RSV season were Bordetella pertussis PCR positive during a nonepidemic period. These data show that screening may not be useful when pertussis prevalence is low.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)95-97
Number of pages3
JournalInfection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006

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Respiratory Syncytial Viruses
Whooping Cough
Bordetella pertussis
Polymerase Chain Reaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Immunology

Cite this

Low prevalence of pertussis among children admitted with respiratory symptoms during respiratory syncytial virus season. / Siberry, George K.; Paquette, Nicholas R.; Ross, Tracy L.; Perl, Trish M.; Valsamakis, Alexandra.

In: Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, Vol. 27, No. 1, 01.12.2006, p. 95-97.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Siberry, George K. ; Paquette, Nicholas R. ; Ross, Tracy L. ; Perl, Trish M. ; Valsamakis, Alexandra. / Low prevalence of pertussis among children admitted with respiratory symptoms during respiratory syncytial virus season. In: Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology. 2006 ; Vol. 27, No. 1. pp. 95-97.
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