Lympathic mapping and sentinel node identification in patients with cervix cancer undergoing radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy

Charles Levenback, Robert L. Coleman, Thomas W. Burke, W. Michael Lin, William Erdman, Michael Deavers, Ebrahim S. Delpassand

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

244 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of sentinel node identification in patients with invasive cervix cancer undergoing radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy using preoperative and intraoperative lymphatic mapping. Patients and Methods: Thirty-nine patients at two institutions were enrolled onto this institutional review board-approved study. All underwent preoperative lymphoscintigraphy and intraoperative lymphatic mapping with blue dye and a handheld gamma probe. Radical hysterectomy was aborted in four patients because metastatic disease was discovered on frozen section analysis of the sentinel node. Results: Preoperative lymphoscintigraphy revealed at least one sentinel node in 33 patients (85%), including 21 (55%) with bilateral sentinel nodes. All 39 patients had at least one sentinel node identified intraoperatively. Eighty percent of sentinel nodes were in three pelvic locations: iliac, obturator, and parametrial (in descending order of frequency). The remaining sentinel nodes were in the common iliac and para-aortic nodal basins. A total of 132 nodes were identified clinically as sentinel nodes; 65 (49%) were both blue and hot, 35 (27%) were blue only, and 32 (24%) were hot only. Eight patients (21%) had metastatic disease. In five of these patients, sentinel nodes were the only positive lymph nodes. One patient had false-negative sentinel nodes. She had four microscopically positive parametrial nodes that were resected in continuity with the uterus. The sensitivity of the sentinel node was 87.5% and the negative predictive value was 97%. Conclusion: Preoperative lymphoscintigraphy and intraoperative lymphatic mapping were highly successful at identifying sentinel nodes in patients undergoing radical hysterectomy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)688-693
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Oncology
Volume20
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2002

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Lymph Node Excision
Hysterectomy
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Lymphoscintigraphy
cyhalothrin
Research Ethics Committees
Frozen Sections
Uterus
Coloring Agents
Lymph Nodes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

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Lympathic mapping and sentinel node identification in patients with cervix cancer undergoing radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy. / Levenback, Charles; Coleman, Robert L.; Burke, Thomas W.; Lin, W. Michael; Erdman, William; Deavers, Michael; Delpassand, Ebrahim S.

In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, Vol. 20, No. 3, 01.02.2002, p. 688-693.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Levenback, Charles ; Coleman, Robert L. ; Burke, Thomas W. ; Lin, W. Michael ; Erdman, William ; Deavers, Michael ; Delpassand, Ebrahim S. / Lympathic mapping and sentinel node identification in patients with cervix cancer undergoing radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy. In: Journal of Clinical Oncology. 2002 ; Vol. 20, No. 3. pp. 688-693.
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