Made to stick

Anti-adhesion therapy for bacterial infections

Anne Marie Krachler, Kim Orth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Multidrug-resistant strains of pathogens necessitate development of alternative means to prevent and treat bacterial infections. Bacterial adherence to host tissues is a universally required early step for establishing infections and, thus, targeting this process holds promise as an alternative approach to conventional antibiotics for treating bacterial infections. Because anti-adhesive compounds clear rather than kill bacteria, there is no selective pressure on the pathogen to develop resistance to this process, reducing the likelihood that a dominantly resistant population will develop. Although several compounds show promise, the wider use of anti-adhesion therapy will depend on the discovery of new anti-adhesion drug targets and on compounds with better affinity, stability, and bioavailability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)286-290
Number of pages5
JournalMicrobe
Volume8
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jul 2013

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Bacterial Infections
Adhesives
Biological Availability
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Bacteria
Therapeutics
Infection
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology

Cite this

Made to stick : Anti-adhesion therapy for bacterial infections. / Krachler, Anne Marie; Orth, Kim.

In: Microbe, Vol. 8, No. 7, 07.2013, p. 286-290.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Krachler, AM & Orth, K 2013, 'Made to stick: Anti-adhesion therapy for bacterial infections', Microbe, vol. 8, no. 7, pp. 286-290.
Krachler, Anne Marie ; Orth, Kim. / Made to stick : Anti-adhesion therapy for bacterial infections. In: Microbe. 2013 ; Vol. 8, No. 7. pp. 286-290.
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