Magnetic resonance imaging assessment of the severity of mitral regurgitation

Comparison with invasive techniques

W. G. Hundley, H. F. Li, J. E. Willard, C. Landau, R. A. Lange, B. M. Meshack, L. D. Hillis, Ronald M Peshock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

165 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: In the patient with mitral regurgitation who is being considered for valvular surgery, cardiac catheterization is usually performed to quantify the severity of regurgitation and to determine its influence on left ventricular volumes and systolic function. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) potentially provides a rapid, noninvasive method of acquiring these data. Thus, this study was done to determine whether MRI can reliably measure the magnitude of mitral regurgitation and evaluate the effect of regurgitation on left ventricular volumes and systolic function. Methods and Results: Twenty-three subjects (14 women and 9 men 15 to 72 years of age) with (n=17) or without (n=6) mitral regurgitation underwent MRI scanning followed immediately by cardiac catheterization. The presence (or absence) of valvular regurgitation was determined, and left ventricular volumes and regurgitant fraction were quantified during each procedure. There was excellent correlation between invasive and MRI assessments of left ventricular end-diastolic (r=.95) and end-systolic (r=.95) volumes and regurgitant fraction (r=.96). All MRI examinations were completed in <28 minutes. Conclusions: In the patient with mitral regurgitation, MRI compares favorably with cardiac catheterization for assessment of the magnitude of regurgitation and its influence on left ventricular volumes and systolic function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1151-1158
Number of pages8
JournalCirculation
Volume92
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1995

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Mitral Valve Insufficiency
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Cardiac Catheterization

Keywords

  • blood flow
  • cardiovascular images
  • magnetic resonance imaging
  • mitral valve
  • regurgitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Hundley, W. G., Li, H. F., Willard, J. E., Landau, C., Lange, R. A., Meshack, B. M., ... Peshock, R. M. (1995). Magnetic resonance imaging assessment of the severity of mitral regurgitation: Comparison with invasive techniques. Circulation, 92(5), 1151-1158.

Magnetic resonance imaging assessment of the severity of mitral regurgitation : Comparison with invasive techniques. / Hundley, W. G.; Li, H. F.; Willard, J. E.; Landau, C.; Lange, R. A.; Meshack, B. M.; Hillis, L. D.; Peshock, Ronald M.

In: Circulation, Vol. 92, No. 5, 1995, p. 1151-1158.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hundley, WG, Li, HF, Willard, JE, Landau, C, Lange, RA, Meshack, BM, Hillis, LD & Peshock, RM 1995, 'Magnetic resonance imaging assessment of the severity of mitral regurgitation: Comparison with invasive techniques', Circulation, vol. 92, no. 5, pp. 1151-1158.
Hundley WG, Li HF, Willard JE, Landau C, Lange RA, Meshack BM et al. Magnetic resonance imaging assessment of the severity of mitral regurgitation: Comparison with invasive techniques. Circulation. 1995;92(5):1151-1158.
Hundley, W. G. ; Li, H. F. ; Willard, J. E. ; Landau, C. ; Lange, R. A. ; Meshack, B. M. ; Hillis, L. D. ; Peshock, Ronald M. / Magnetic resonance imaging assessment of the severity of mitral regurgitation : Comparison with invasive techniques. In: Circulation. 1995 ; Vol. 92, No. 5. pp. 1151-1158.
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AU - Landau, C.

AU - Lange, R. A.

AU - Meshack, B. M.

AU - Hillis, L. D.

AU - Peshock, Ronald M

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