Major differences in the spectrum of gastrointestinal infections associated with AIDS in India versus the West: An autopsy study

D. N. Lanjewar, B. S. Anand, R. Genta, M. B. Maheshwari, M. A. Ansari, S. K. Hira, H. L. DuPont

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18 Scopus citations

Abstract

The spectrum of bowel infections in patients with AIDS in India is not well characterized. To examine this spectrum of infections, an autopsy study of 49 subjects was carried out. Multiple sections were obtained from the gastrointestinal tract. A pathogenic organism was detected in 25 (71%) of 35 patients with diarrhea vs. 4 (29%) of 14 patients without diarrhea (P < .01). The most frequent pathogen was cytomegalovirus (in 13; 27%), followed by parasites (9; 18%), fungi 18; 16%) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (7; 14%). This is the first autopsy study of patients with AIDS in the Indian subcontinent and shows important differences in the profile of their opportunistic infections compared with those of such patients in the West. These findings will help define the optimal diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to patients with AIDS, which, in view of the considerable budgetary restrictions in developing countries, should be targeted toward the pathogens most frequently identified in such areas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)482-485
Number of pages4
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Lanjewar, D. N., Anand, B. S., Genta, R., Maheshwari, M. B., Ansari, M. A., Hira, S. K., & DuPont, H. L. (1996). Major differences in the spectrum of gastrointestinal infections associated with AIDS in India versus the West: An autopsy study. Clinical Infectious Diseases, 23(3), 482-485. https://doi.org/10.1093/clinids/23.3.482