Malignant mesothelioma

Facts, Myths, and Hypotheses

Michele Carbone, Bevan H. Ly, Ronald F. Dodson, Ian Pagano, Paul T. Morris, Umran A. Dogan, Adi F. Gazdar, Harvey I. Pass, Haining Yang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

193 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is a neoplasm arising from mesothelial cells lining the pleural, peritoneal, and pericardial cavities. Over 20 million people in the US are at risk of developing MM due to asbestos exposure. MM mortality rates are estimated to increase by 5-10% per year in most industrialized countries until about 2020. The incidence of MM in men has continued to rise during the past 50 years, while the incidence in women appears largely unchanged. It is estimated that about 50-80% of pleural MM in men and 20-30% in women developed in individuals whose history indicates asbestos exposure(s) above that expected from most background settings. While rare for women, about 30% of peritoneal mesothelioma in men has been associated with exposure to asbestos. Erionite is a potent carcinogenic mineral fiber capable of causing both pleural and peritoneal MM. Since erionite is considerably less widespread than asbestos, the number of MM cases associated with erionite exposure is smaller. Asbestos induces DNA alterations mostly by inducing mesothelial cells and reactive macrophages to secrete mutagenic oxygen and nitrogen species. In addition, asbestos carcinogenesis is linked to the chronic inflammatory process caused by the deposition of a sufficient number of asbestos fibers and the consequent release of pro-inflammatory molecules, especially HMGB-1, the master switch that starts the inflammatory process, and TNF-alpha by macrophages and mesothelial cells. Genetic predisposition, radiation exposure and viral infection are co-factors that can alone or together with asbestos and erionite cause MM.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)44-58
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Cellular Physiology
Volume227
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2012

Fingerprint

Asbestos
Macrophages
Mesothelial Neoplasms
HMGB Proteins
Mineral Fibers
Pleural Cavity
Malignant Mesothelioma
Pericardium
Mesothelioma
Incidence
Peritoneal Cavity
Virus Diseases
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Linings
Developed Countries
Carcinogenesis
Nitrogen
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
History
Switches

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology
  • Physiology

Cite this

Carbone, M., Ly, B. H., Dodson, R. F., Pagano, I., Morris, P. T., Dogan, U. A., ... Yang, H. (2012). Malignant mesothelioma: Facts, Myths, and Hypotheses. Journal of Cellular Physiology, 227(1), 44-58. https://doi.org/10.1002/jcp.22724

Malignant mesothelioma : Facts, Myths, and Hypotheses. / Carbone, Michele; Ly, Bevan H.; Dodson, Ronald F.; Pagano, Ian; Morris, Paul T.; Dogan, Umran A.; Gazdar, Adi F.; Pass, Harvey I.; Yang, Haining.

In: Journal of Cellular Physiology, Vol. 227, No. 1, 01.2012, p. 44-58.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Carbone, M, Ly, BH, Dodson, RF, Pagano, I, Morris, PT, Dogan, UA, Gazdar, AF, Pass, HI & Yang, H 2012, 'Malignant mesothelioma: Facts, Myths, and Hypotheses', Journal of Cellular Physiology, vol. 227, no. 1, pp. 44-58. https://doi.org/10.1002/jcp.22724
Carbone M, Ly BH, Dodson RF, Pagano I, Morris PT, Dogan UA et al. Malignant mesothelioma: Facts, Myths, and Hypotheses. Journal of Cellular Physiology. 2012 Jan;227(1):44-58. https://doi.org/10.1002/jcp.22724
Carbone, Michele ; Ly, Bevan H. ; Dodson, Ronald F. ; Pagano, Ian ; Morris, Paul T. ; Dogan, Umran A. ; Gazdar, Adi F. ; Pass, Harvey I. ; Yang, Haining. / Malignant mesothelioma : Facts, Myths, and Hypotheses. In: Journal of Cellular Physiology. 2012 ; Vol. 227, No. 1. pp. 44-58.
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