Manipulation of kinase signaling by bacterial pathogens

Anne Marie Krachler, Andrew R. Woolery, Kim Orth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

70 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Bacterial pathogens use effector proteins to manipulate their hosts to propagate infection. These effectors divert host cell signaling pathways to the benefit of the pathogen and frequently target kinase signaling cascades. Notable pathways that are usurped include the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt, and p21-activated kinase (PAK) pathways. Analyzing the functions of pathogenic effectors and their intersection with host kinase pathways has provided interesting insights into both the mechanisms of virulence and eukaryotic signaling.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1083-1092
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Cell Biology
Volume195
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2011

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Phosphotransferases
p21-Activated Kinases
Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase
Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases
Virulence
Infection
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Manipulation of kinase signaling by bacterial pathogens. / Krachler, Anne Marie; Woolery, Andrew R.; Orth, Kim.

In: Journal of Cell Biology, Vol. 195, No. 7, 12.2011, p. 1083-1092.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Krachler, Anne Marie ; Woolery, Andrew R. ; Orth, Kim. / Manipulation of kinase signaling by bacterial pathogens. In: Journal of Cell Biology. 2011 ; Vol. 195, No. 7. pp. 1083-1092.
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