Mastopexy preferences: A survey of board-certified plastic surgeons

Rod J. Rohrich, Amanda A. Gosman, Spencer A. Brown, Joan Reisch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this survey was to assess the current trends in mastopexy techniques and to compare satisfaction rates and complications associated with different techniques. METHODS: In September of 2002, a mastopexy survey was sent to 1500 members of the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery; 487 complete responses were received, for a response rate of 32.5 percent. Questions elicited categorical answers, and the data were evaluated using the chi-square test and the comparison of two proportions. RESULTS: The inverted-T incision technique is the most popular. Satisfaction was reported to be highest with the short scar periareolar inferior pedicle reduction (or SPAIR) and Hall-Findlay techniques. Physician satisfaction was lowest with the periareolar technique. The three most common complications for all techniques were suture spitting, excess scarring, and bottoming out. The periareolar group had a greater frequency of revision (p = 0.002). The inverted-T group had a greater frequency of bottoming out (p = 0.043). The short scar group had a greater frequency of asymmetry (p = 0.008). CONCLUSIONS: The traditional inverted-T technique is the most popular, but the newer short scar techniques have become more popular in the last 5 years. The inverted-T incision continues to be associated with bottoming out and excess scarring. The periareolar technique has the greatest need for revision and the lowest physician satisfaction, despite its application to a greater volume of mastopexies per year.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1631-1638
Number of pages8
JournalPlastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Volume118
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2006

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Cicatrix
Plastic Surgery
Physicians
Suture Techniques
Chi-Square Distribution
Surgeons
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Mastopexy preferences : A survey of board-certified plastic surgeons. / Rohrich, Rod J.; Gosman, Amanda A.; Brown, Spencer A.; Reisch, Joan.

In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Vol. 118, No. 7, 12.2006, p. 1631-1638.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rohrich, Rod J. ; Gosman, Amanda A. ; Brown, Spencer A. ; Reisch, Joan. / Mastopexy preferences : A survey of board-certified plastic surgeons. In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. 2006 ; Vol. 118, No. 7. pp. 1631-1638.
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