Maturational effects of glucocorticoids on neonatal brush-border membrane phosphate transport

M. Arar, M. Levi, M. Baum

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Abstract

Previous studies have implicated glucocorticoids as an important factor in the postnatal maturational increase in proximal tubule volume absorption, Na+/II+ antiporter, Na(HCO3)3 symporter, and Na+-K+-ATPase activity. The present study examined whether glucocorticoids are also a potentially important factor in the maturational decrease in proximal tubule phosphate transport. Renal BBMs were prepared from neonatal rabbits who received dexamethasone (10 μg/100 g body weight) or vehicle. Brush-border membrane vesicles from dexamethasone-treated neonates had a lower rate of Na-phosphate cotransport than controls (50.8 ± 3.6 versus 29.2 ± 2.6 pmol 32P(i)/10 s/mg protein, p < 0.001). This decrease was due to a decrease in the V(max) with no change in the affinity of the transporter for phosphate. The dexamethasone-induced decrease in BBM Na-phosphate transport was not due to a reduction in transporters as assayed by phosphate-protectable Na-dependent equilibrium binding of phosphonoformic acid. Dexamethasone treatment caused an increase in the fluorescence anisotropy of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene and trimethylammonium-1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (i.e. a decrease in membrane fluidity). Brush-border membranes from dexamethasone-treated neonates had a decrease in sphingomyelin and an increase in phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol content but no change in cholesterol or total phospholipid content. These data are consistent with glucocorticoids playing a role in the postnatal maturational decrease in proximal tubule phosphate transport by altering membrane characteristics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)474-478
Number of pages5
JournalPediatric Research
Volume35
Issue number4 I
StatePublished - 1994

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Microvilli
Dexamethasone
Glucocorticoids
Phosphates
Membranes
Diphenylhexatriene
Phosphate Transport Proteins
Foscarnet
Antiporters
Symporters
Membrane Fluidity
Fluorescence Polarization
Sphingomyelins
Phosphatidylinositols
Phosphatidylcholines
Phospholipids
Cholesterol
Body Weight
Rabbits
Kidney

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Maturational effects of glucocorticoids on neonatal brush-border membrane phosphate transport. / Arar, M.; Levi, M.; Baum, M.

In: Pediatric Research, Vol. 35, No. 4 I, 1994, p. 474-478.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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