Maximal inspiratory pressure following endurance training at altitude

B. Hanel, B. D. Levine, K. Engfred, P. S. Clifford, D. B. Friedman, N. H. Secher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Effects of endurance training on maximal inspiratory pressure and fatigue were evaluated after 5 weeks. Twelve male and 9 female untrained subjects were matched in the three groups for sex and maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O2max). Training was performed at 70% V̇O2 max; 45 min day -1; 5 days week -1 (n = 7); and at the same relative (n = 7) and absolute (n = 7) work loads in a pressure chamber corresponding to 2500m (560mmHg). Work load was increased every week to maintain the training heart rate. Maximal inspiratory pressure was measured at the mouth before and 30, 60 and 120s after maximal exercise. With no significant difference between the three groups of subjects, V̇O2max increased from 2.96 (1.98-4.47) (median and range for 21 subjects) to 3.33 (2.50-4.72) 1 min-1 (p<0.001) and ventilation (V̇Emax) from 109 (57-147) to 123 (73-148)1 min -1 (p < 0.001), while maximal heart rate decreased from 193 (180-211) to 192 (169-207) beats min-1 (p < 0.01). Maximal inspiratory pressure (87 (56-115) mmHg), inspiratory muscle fatigue (18(-2-43)%, p<0.001), and arterial oxygen tension during exercise (12.4 (9.9-15.6) kPa) were similar before and after training. The results demonstrate that training at simulated altitude at 2500 m does not increase V̇E max or V̇O2 max above the increases obtained from training at sea level. Furthermore, V̇E max and V̇O2 max increased approximately 13% despite unchanged maximal inspiratory pressure and inspiratory muscle fatigue. These findings indicate that inspiratory muscles do not limit maximal performance of short duration in untrained humans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)59-67
Number of pages9
JournalErgonomics
Volume37
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1994

Fingerprint

endurance
Durability
Muscle Fatigue
Muscle
Workload
fatigue
Fatigue of materials
Heart Rate
Oxygen
Oceans and Seas
Fatigue
Ventilation
Sea level
Mouth
Arterial Pressure
chamber
Pressure
Muscles
Maximal Respiratory Pressures
Group

Keywords

  • Blood levels
  • Fatigue
  • Lung
  • Muscles
  • Oxygen
  • Pulmonary diffusion
  • Respiratory
  • Training
  • V̇Omax
  • Ventilation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering
  • Psychology(all)
  • Applied Psychology
  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

Cite this

Hanel, B., Levine, B. D., Engfred, K., Clifford, P. S., Friedman, D. B., & Secher, N. H. (1994). Maximal inspiratory pressure following endurance training at altitude. Ergonomics, 37(1), 59-67.

Maximal inspiratory pressure following endurance training at altitude. / Hanel, B.; Levine, B. D.; Engfred, K.; Clifford, P. S.; Friedman, D. B.; Secher, N. H.

In: Ergonomics, Vol. 37, No. 1, 01.1994, p. 59-67.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hanel, B, Levine, BD, Engfred, K, Clifford, PS, Friedman, DB & Secher, NH 1994, 'Maximal inspiratory pressure following endurance training at altitude', Ergonomics, vol. 37, no. 1, pp. 59-67.
Hanel B, Levine BD, Engfred K, Clifford PS, Friedman DB, Secher NH. Maximal inspiratory pressure following endurance training at altitude. Ergonomics. 1994 Jan;37(1):59-67.
Hanel, B. ; Levine, B. D. ; Engfred, K. ; Clifford, P. S. ; Friedman, D. B. ; Secher, N. H. / Maximal inspiratory pressure following endurance training at altitude. In: Ergonomics. 1994 ; Vol. 37, No. 1. pp. 59-67.
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abstract = "Effects of endurance training on maximal inspiratory pressure and fatigue were evaluated after 5 weeks. Twelve male and 9 female untrained subjects were matched in the three groups for sex and maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O2max). Training was performed at 70{\%} V̇O2 max; 45 min day -1; 5 days week -1 (n = 7); and at the same relative (n = 7) and absolute (n = 7) work loads in a pressure chamber corresponding to 2500m (560mmHg). Work load was increased every week to maintain the training heart rate. Maximal inspiratory pressure was measured at the mouth before and 30, 60 and 120s after maximal exercise. With no significant difference between the three groups of subjects, V̇O2max increased from 2.96 (1.98-4.47) (median and range for 21 subjects) to 3.33 (2.50-4.72) 1 min-1 (p<0.001) and ventilation (V̇Emax) from 109 (57-147) to 123 (73-148)1 min -1 (p < 0.001), while maximal heart rate decreased from 193 (180-211) to 192 (169-207) beats min-1 (p < 0.01). Maximal inspiratory pressure (87 (56-115) mmHg), inspiratory muscle fatigue (18(-2-43){\%}, p<0.001), and arterial oxygen tension during exercise (12.4 (9.9-15.6) kPa) were similar before and after training. The results demonstrate that training at simulated altitude at 2500 m does not increase V̇E max or V̇O2 max above the increases obtained from training at sea level. Furthermore, V̇E max and V̇O2 max increased approximately 13{\%} despite unchanged maximal inspiratory pressure and inspiratory muscle fatigue. These findings indicate that inspiratory muscles do not limit maximal performance of short duration in untrained humans.",
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