Measurement of group delay dispersion of high numerical aperture objective lenses using two-photon excited fluorescence

Jeffrey B. Guild, Chris Xu, Watt W. Webb

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

83 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We determined the group-delay dispersion (GDD) of five microscope objectives by measuring the second-order autocorrelation at the focal points of the objectives with two-photon excited fluorescence as the power square sensor. We found that typical microscope lens systems introduce significant GDD (2000-6500 fs2). The third-order dispersion determined for these objectives limits the minimum obtainable pulse width at the focal point of an objective to 20-30 fs if not compensated. No significant chromatic aberration or higher-order dispersion effects were found for any of the optical components measured within the wavelength range of 700-780 nm and for pulse widths greater than 50-60 fs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)397-401
Number of pages5
JournalApplied Optics
Volume36
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

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Group delay
numerical aperture
Lenses
Photons
Fluorescence
lenses
fluorescence
photons
pulse duration
Microscopes
microscopes
Aberrations
Autocorrelation
autocorrelation
aberration
Wavelength
sensors
Sensors
wavelengths

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics

Cite this

Measurement of group delay dispersion of high numerical aperture objective lenses using two-photon excited fluorescence. / Guild, Jeffrey B.; Xu, Chris; Webb, Watt W.

In: Applied Optics, Vol. 36, No. 1, 01.01.1997, p. 397-401.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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