Mechanisms of degradation of myofibrillar and nonmyofibrillar protein in heart.

J. M. Ord, J. R. Wakeland, J. S. Crie, K. Wildenthal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The degradation of cardiac proteins is known to be altered by many physiological and pathological interventions, but the precise intracellular processes that regulate proteolysis and the relative roles of different proteolytic pathways in degrading different classes of protein remain poorly understood. Agents that interfere with lysosomal function produce major decreases in total protein breakdown; thus, lysosomes and lysosomal proteinases seem to be important in proteolysis. However, these same agents cause no change in the degradation of myofibrillar proteins, suggesting that this class of proteins is not dependent on lysosomal pathways for its turnover.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)195-199
Number of pages5
JournalAdvances in myocardiology
Volume4
StatePublished - 1983

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Proteolysis
Proteins
Lysosomes
Peptide Hydrolases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Ord, J. M., Wakeland, J. R., Crie, J. S., & Wildenthal, K. (1983). Mechanisms of degradation of myofibrillar and nonmyofibrillar protein in heart. Advances in myocardiology, 4, 195-199.

Mechanisms of degradation of myofibrillar and nonmyofibrillar protein in heart. / Ord, J. M.; Wakeland, J. R.; Crie, J. S.; Wildenthal, K.

In: Advances in myocardiology, Vol. 4, 1983, p. 195-199.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ord, JM, Wakeland, JR, Crie, JS & Wildenthal, K 1983, 'Mechanisms of degradation of myofibrillar and nonmyofibrillar protein in heart.', Advances in myocardiology, vol. 4, pp. 195-199.
Ord, J. M. ; Wakeland, J. R. ; Crie, J. S. ; Wildenthal, K. / Mechanisms of degradation of myofibrillar and nonmyofibrillar protein in heart. In: Advances in myocardiology. 1983 ; Vol. 4. pp. 195-199.
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