Media coverage and children's reactions to disaster with implications for primary care and public health.

Betty Pfefferbaum, Hattie Jeon-Slaughter, Rose L. Pfefferbaum, J. Brian Houston, Scott M. Rainwater, James L. Regens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To address the potential for media coverage of traumatic events to generate fear reactions in children, we examined exposure and reactions to media coverage of the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing in children attending a middle school 100 miles from the disaster site two and three years after the event. Many of the children studied recalled feeling "afraid," "sad," or "mad" in relation to initial media coverage. Overall exposure and reactions to bomb-related media coverage declined over the three years. However, these reactions persisted for some children and, when they did, the reactions were related to exposure to coverage right after the bombing. Approximately one-fourth of the children recalled that the bombing made them feel "a lot" less safe in their home, school, and/or neighborhood. These perceptions persisted for approximately 10% of the children. Our Findings suggest the importance of primary care and public health interventions to determine and monitor children's reactions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)312-317
Number of pages6
JournalThe Journal of the Oklahoma State Medical Association
Volume101
Issue number12
StatePublished - Dec 2008

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Disasters
Primary Health Care
Public Health
Bombs
Fear
Emotions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Pfefferbaum, B., Jeon-Slaughter, H., Pfefferbaum, R. L., Houston, J. B., Rainwater, S. M., & Regens, J. L. (2008). Media coverage and children's reactions to disaster with implications for primary care and public health. The Journal of the Oklahoma State Medical Association, 101(12), 312-317.

Media coverage and children's reactions to disaster with implications for primary care and public health. / Pfefferbaum, Betty; Jeon-Slaughter, Hattie; Pfefferbaum, Rose L.; Houston, J. Brian; Rainwater, Scott M.; Regens, James L.

In: The Journal of the Oklahoma State Medical Association, Vol. 101, No. 12, 12.2008, p. 312-317.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pfefferbaum, B, Jeon-Slaughter, H, Pfefferbaum, RL, Houston, JB, Rainwater, SM & Regens, JL 2008, 'Media coverage and children's reactions to disaster with implications for primary care and public health.', The Journal of the Oklahoma State Medical Association, vol. 101, no. 12, pp. 312-317.
Pfefferbaum B, Jeon-Slaughter H, Pfefferbaum RL, Houston JB, Rainwater SM, Regens JL. Media coverage and children's reactions to disaster with implications for primary care and public health. The Journal of the Oklahoma State Medical Association. 2008 Dec;101(12):312-317.
Pfefferbaum, Betty ; Jeon-Slaughter, Hattie ; Pfefferbaum, Rose L. ; Houston, J. Brian ; Rainwater, Scott M. ; Regens, James L. / Media coverage and children's reactions to disaster with implications for primary care and public health. In: The Journal of the Oklahoma State Medical Association. 2008 ; Vol. 101, No. 12. pp. 312-317.
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