Medical Comorbidities and Medication Use Among Homeless Adults Seeking Mental Health Treatment

Elizabeth Mayfield Arnold, Chance R. Strenth, Luke P. Hedrick, Robert C. Paterson, Julian Curiel, Amira E. Joseph, Thomas W. Brown, James N. Kimball

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Little is known about the medical conditions and medication use of individuals who are homeless and have mental health problems. This study used secondary data (N = 933) from a mental health clinic serving homeless adults. Primary outcomes were the number and types of self-reported medical conditions and medications. About half (52.60%) of participants were taking one or more medications (mean = 1.67; SD = 2.30), most commonly antidepressants, antipsychotics, and anticonvulsants. Most frequently reported medical conditions were headaches/migraines, hypertension, and arthritis with a mean of 3.09 (SD = 2.74) conditions. Age and sex were significant predictors of the number of medical conditions. Age and the length of time homeless were significant predictors of the number of medications taken. Results suggest that those who are older and have been homeless longer appear to be increased risk for health problems and may need more medications to manage these conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)885-893
Number of pages9
JournalCommunity Mental Health Journal
Volume56
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2020

Keywords

  • Co-morbidities
  • Health care
  • Homeless
  • Medication use
  • Mental health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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  • Cite this

    Arnold, E. M., Strenth, C. R., Hedrick, L. P., Paterson, R. C., Curiel, J., Joseph, A. E., Brown, T. W., & Kimball, J. N. (2020). Medical Comorbidities and Medication Use Among Homeless Adults Seeking Mental Health Treatment. Community Mental Health Journal, 56(5), 885-893. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10597-020-00552-4