Metabolic and contractile changes in fast and slow muscles of the cat after glucocorticoid-induced atrophy

P. F. Gardiner, B. R. Botterman, E. Eldred, D. R. Simpson, V. R. Edgerton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The susceptibility of fast- and slow-twitch hind limb muscles to glucocorticoid-induced atrophy was investigated in adult male cats treated for 10 to 14 days with triamcinolone (4 mg/kg/day), using several histochemical, biochemical, and functional indices. After treatment, muscle weight loss in the fast-twitch muscles (medial gastrocnemius and vastus medialis) occurred to a greater extent than in the slow-twitch muscles (soleus and vastus intermedius), with the latter muscles decreasing in weight proportional to the body weight. Fast-twitch glycolytic (FG) fibers responded with similar degrees of atrophy in the muscles examined; however, slow-twitch oxidative (SO) and fast-twitch oxidative glycolytic (FOG) fibers atrophied more in the fast-twitch compared to the slow-twitch muscles. Phosphofructokinase and NADP+-linked isocitrate dehydrogenase specific activities decreased similarly in the fast-twitch muscles, while no change occurred in the slow-twitch muscles. Functionally, the soleus and medial gastrocnemius remained unchanged in abilities to generate tension tetanically, when this was expressed per unit muscle mass or per unit contractile protein. As a result of the treatment, however, the medial gastrocnemius fatigued faster in response to repetitive stimulation in the glucocorticoid-treated animals. The results suggest that the response of muscle to glucocorticoid-induced atrophy is not regulated by the primary metabolic pathways used for energy production. The differences in response of the SO and FOG fiber types in fast- versus slow-twitch muscles suggest basic differences in metabolic and activity profiles of the same fiber types in different muscles, which may influence susceptibility to atrophy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)241-255
Number of pages15
JournalExperimental Neurology
Volume62
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1978

Fingerprint

Glucocorticoids
Atrophy
Cats
Muscles
Quadriceps Muscle
Skeletal Muscle
Triamcinolone
Contractile Proteins
Phosphofructokinases
Muscular Atrophy
Metabolome
Metabolic Networks and Pathways
Weight Loss
Extremities
Body Weight
Weights and Measures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Neurology

Cite this

Metabolic and contractile changes in fast and slow muscles of the cat after glucocorticoid-induced atrophy. / Gardiner, P. F.; Botterman, B. R.; Eldred, E.; Simpson, D. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

In: Experimental Neurology, Vol. 62, No. 1, 1978, p. 241-255.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gardiner, P. F. ; Botterman, B. R. ; Eldred, E. ; Simpson, D. R. ; Edgerton, V. R. / Metabolic and contractile changes in fast and slow muscles of the cat after glucocorticoid-induced atrophy. In: Experimental Neurology. 1978 ; Vol. 62, No. 1. pp. 241-255.
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