MicroRNA1 influences cardiac differentiation in Drosophila and regulates Notch signaling

Chulan Kwon, Zhe Han, Eric N. Olson, Deepak Srivastava

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

335 Scopus citations

Abstract

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are genomically encoded small RNAs that hybridize with messenger RNAs, resulting in degradation or translational inhibition of targeted transcripts. The potential for miRNAs to regulate cell-lineage determination or differentiation from pluripotent progenitor or stem cells is unknown. Here, we show that microRNA1 (miR-1) is an ancient muscle-specific gene conserved in sequence and expression in Drosophila. Drosophila miR-1 (dmiR-1) is regulated through a serum response factor-like binding site in cardiac progenitor cells. Loss- and gain-of-function studies demonstrated a role for dmiR-1 in modulating cardiogenesis and in maintenance of muscle-gene expression. We provide in vivo evidence that dmiR-1 targets transcripts encoding the Notch ligand Delta, providing a potential mechanism for the expansion of cardiac and muscle progenitor cells and failure of progenitor cell differentiation in some dmiR-1 mutants. These findings demonstrate that dmiR-1 may "fine-tune" critical steps involved in differentiation of cardiac and somatic muscle progenitors and targets a pathway required for progenitor cell specification and asymmetric cell division.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)18986-18991
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume102
Issue number52
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 27 2005

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Keywords

  • Cardiogenesis
  • Delta
  • MicroRNA
  • Progenitor cells
  • Stem cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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