Microtubule associated protein 2 in bipolar depression

Impact of pregnenolone

Shivani Daftary, Jung Min Yon, Ehn Kyoung Choi, Yun Bae Kim, Collette Bice, Alexandra Kulikova, John Park, E. Sherwood Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Pregnenolone, and related neurosteroids, may have antidepressant properties. Preclinical research proposes that microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP2) binding may be a mechanism for antidepressant properties of pregnenolone. Thus, MAP2 might be a novel target for antidepressant therapy. This clinical study is the first to examine serum MAP2 levels in people with bipolar depression and controls, and whether pregnenolone treatment is associated with a change in MAP2 levels. Methods Blood samples from a previously published clinical trial of pregnenolone for adult bipolar depression were analyzed at baseline and week 6 of treatment with pregnenolone or placebo for serum MAP2 levels using Western Blot. MAP2 levels from healthy controls were also obtained. Results MAP2 levels in the bipolar depressed patients (n=11) tended to be higher than in controls (n=4) (p=0.062). MAP2 levels decreased non-significantly from baseline to week 6 in placebo (n=5) and pregnenolone-treated patients (n=6). MAP2 level changes correlated positively with change in self-reported depressive symptom scores in the pregnenolone group (r=0.771, p=0.072) but not in the placebo group (r=0.000, p=1.000). Limitations This study, exploring relationships between MAP-2 in humans with mood disorders, is limited by the small sample size. Thus, the findings must be viewed with great caution. Conclusion These findings suggest possible differences in serum MAP-2 levels between bipolar depressed persons and controls and a relationship between changes in depressive symptoms and MAP-2 levels during pregnenolone therapy. Findings suggest additional research is needed on MAP-2 in mood disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)49-52
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Affective Disorders
Volume218
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 15 2017

Fingerprint

Pregnenolone
Microtubule-Associated Proteins
Bipolar Disorder
Antidepressive Agents
Placebos
Mood Disorders
Blood Proteins
Depression
Therapeutics
Research
Protein Binding
Sample Size
Neurotransmitter Agents
Western Blotting
Clinical Trials

Keywords

  • Bipolar disorder
  • Depression
  • Microtubule associated protein 2
  • Pregnenolone

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Microtubule associated protein 2 in bipolar depression : Impact of pregnenolone. / Daftary, Shivani; Yon, Jung Min; Choi, Ehn Kyoung; Kim, Yun Bae; Bice, Collette; Kulikova, Alexandra; Park, John; Sherwood Brown, E.

In: Journal of Affective Disorders, Vol. 218, 15.08.2017, p. 49-52.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Daftary, Shivani ; Yon, Jung Min ; Choi, Ehn Kyoung ; Kim, Yun Bae ; Bice, Collette ; Kulikova, Alexandra ; Park, John ; Sherwood Brown, E. / Microtubule associated protein 2 in bipolar depression : Impact of pregnenolone. In: Journal of Affective Disorders. 2017 ; Vol. 218. pp. 49-52.
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abstract = "Background Pregnenolone, and related neurosteroids, may have antidepressant properties. Preclinical research proposes that microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP2) binding may be a mechanism for antidepressant properties of pregnenolone. Thus, MAP2 might be a novel target for antidepressant therapy. This clinical study is the first to examine serum MAP2 levels in people with bipolar depression and controls, and whether pregnenolone treatment is associated with a change in MAP2 levels. Methods Blood samples from a previously published clinical trial of pregnenolone for adult bipolar depression were analyzed at baseline and week 6 of treatment with pregnenolone or placebo for serum MAP2 levels using Western Blot. MAP2 levels from healthy controls were also obtained. Results MAP2 levels in the bipolar depressed patients (n=11) tended to be higher than in controls (n=4) (p=0.062). MAP2 levels decreased non-significantly from baseline to week 6 in placebo (n=5) and pregnenolone-treated patients (n=6). MAP2 level changes correlated positively with change in self-reported depressive symptom scores in the pregnenolone group (r=0.771, p=0.072) but not in the placebo group (r=0.000, p=1.000). Limitations This study, exploring relationships between MAP-2 in humans with mood disorders, is limited by the small sample size. Thus, the findings must be viewed with great caution. Conclusion These findings suggest possible differences in serum MAP-2 levels between bipolar depressed persons and controls and a relationship between changes in depressive symptoms and MAP-2 levels during pregnenolone therapy. Findings suggest additional research is needed on MAP-2 in mood disorders.",
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