Microwave ablation of osteoid osteoma: initial experience and efficacy

Elliot S. Rinzler, Giridhar M. Shivaram, Dennis W. Shaw, Eric J. Monroe, Kevin S.H. Koo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Image-guided percutaneous microwave ablation has been used to treat adult osteoid osteomas but has not been thoroughly evaluated in the pediatric population. Objective: To evaluate the technical feasibility and clinical efficacy of microwave ablation to treat osteoid osteomas in pediatric patients. Materials and methods: The electronic medical record and imaging archive were reviewed for 24 consecutive patients who had undergone microwave ablation of osteoid osteomas between January 1, 2015, and May 31, 2018, at a single tertiary care pediatric hospital. All patients were diagnosed by clinical and imaging criteria, and referred by a pediatric orthopedic surgeon after failing conservative management with pain medication. The average age of the patients was 13.3 years (range: 3–18 years), and the average size of the osteoid osteoma nidus was 8.8 mm (range: 5–22 mm). Technical success was defined as placement of the microwave antenna at the distal margin of the lesion nidus and achievement of the target ablation temperature. Clinical findings were assessed pre- and post-ablation and clinical success was defined as complete relief of pain without pain medication at 1-month follow-up. The number and severity of complications were also documented. Results: Clinical success was achieved in 100% of patients (24/24), with all reporting complete cessation of pain medication use 1 week after treatment and 0/10 pain at 1 month. There were 4 minor complications (17%) including access site numbness and a minor soft-tissue infection. There were no major complications. Conclusion: Microwave ablation is a technically feasible and clinically effective treatment for pediatric osteoid osteomas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)566-570
Number of pages5
JournalPediatric Radiology
Volume49
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Osteoid Osteoma
Microwaves
Pain
Pediatrics
Soft Tissue Infections
Pediatric Hospitals
Hypesthesia
Electronic Health Records
Diagnostic Imaging
Tertiary Healthcare
Temperature
Therapeutics
Population

Keywords

  • Bone
  • Children
  • Interventional radiology
  • Microwave ablation
  • Osteoid osteoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Microwave ablation of osteoid osteoma : initial experience and efficacy. / Rinzler, Elliot S.; Shivaram, Giridhar M.; Shaw, Dennis W.; Monroe, Eric J.; Koo, Kevin S.H.

In: Pediatric Radiology, Vol. 49, No. 4, 01.04.2019, p. 566-570.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rinzler, Elliot S. ; Shivaram, Giridhar M. ; Shaw, Dennis W. ; Monroe, Eric J. ; Koo, Kevin S.H. / Microwave ablation of osteoid osteoma : initial experience and efficacy. In: Pediatric Radiology. 2019 ; Vol. 49, No. 4. pp. 566-570.
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