Midpregnancy genitourinary tract infection with Chlamydia trachomatis: Association with subsequent preterm delivery in women with bacterial vaginosis and Trichomonas vaginalis

William W. Andrews, Mark A. Klebanoff, Elizabeth A. Thom, John C. Hauth, J. Christopher Carey, Paul J. Meis, Steve N. Caritis, Kenneth J. Leveno, Ronald J. Wapner, Michael W. Varner, J. D. Iams, Atef Moawad, Menachem Miodovnik, Baha Sibai, Mitchell Dombrowski, Oded Langer, Mary J. O'Sullivan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The objective of the study was to estimate whether midpregnancy genitourinary tract infection with Chlamydia trachomatis is associated with an increased risk of subsequent preterm delivery. Study design: Infection with C. trachomatis was determined using a ligase chain reaction assay (performed in batch after delivery) of voided urine samples collected at the randomization visit (160/7 to 236/7 weeks' gestation) and the follow-up visit (240/7 to 296/7 weeks) among 2470 gravide women with bacterial vaginosis or Trichomonas vaginalis infection enrolled in 2 multicenter randomized antibiotic treatment trials (metronidazole versus. placebo). Results: The overall prevalence of genitourinary tract C. trachomatis infection at both visits was 10%. Preterm delivery less than 37 weeks' or less than 35 weeks' gestational age was not associated with the presence or absence of C. trachomatis infection at either the randomization (less than 37 weeks: 14% versus 13%, P=.58; less than 35 weeks: 6.4% versus 5.5%, P=.55) or the follow-up visit (less than 37 weeks: 13% versus 11%, P=.33; less than 35 weeks: 4.4% versus 3.7, P=.62). Treatment with an antibiotic effective against chlamydia infection was not associated with a statistically significant difference in preterm delivery. Conclusion: In this secondary analysis, midtrimester chlamydia infection was not associated with an increased risk of preterm birth. Treatment of chlamydia was not associated with a decreased frequency of preterm birth.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)493-500
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume194
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2006

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Bacterial Vaginosis
Trichomonas vaginalis
Chlamydia Infections
Chlamydia trachomatis
Premature Birth
Random Allocation
Infection
Ligase Chain Reaction
Trichomonas Infections
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Chlamydia
Metronidazole
Second Pregnancy Trimester
Gestational Age
Therapeutics
Placebos
Urine
Pregnancy

Keywords

  • Chlamydia
  • Low birth weight
  • Preterm birth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Midpregnancy genitourinary tract infection with Chlamydia trachomatis : Association with subsequent preterm delivery in women with bacterial vaginosis and Trichomonas vaginalis. / Andrews, William W.; Klebanoff, Mark A.; Thom, Elizabeth A.; Hauth, John C.; Carey, J. Christopher; Meis, Paul J.; Caritis, Steve N.; Leveno, Kenneth J.; Wapner, Ronald J.; Varner, Michael W.; Iams, J. D.; Moawad, Atef; Miodovnik, Menachem; Sibai, Baha; Dombrowski, Mitchell; Langer, Oded; O'Sullivan, Mary J.

In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 194, No. 2, 02.2006, p. 493-500.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Andrews, WW, Klebanoff, MA, Thom, EA, Hauth, JC, Carey, JC, Meis, PJ, Caritis, SN, Leveno, KJ, Wapner, RJ, Varner, MW, Iams, JD, Moawad, A, Miodovnik, M, Sibai, B, Dombrowski, M, Langer, O & O'Sullivan, MJ 2006, 'Midpregnancy genitourinary tract infection with Chlamydia trachomatis: Association with subsequent preterm delivery in women with bacterial vaginosis and Trichomonas vaginalis', American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 194, no. 2, pp. 493-500. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2005.08.054
Andrews, William W. ; Klebanoff, Mark A. ; Thom, Elizabeth A. ; Hauth, John C. ; Carey, J. Christopher ; Meis, Paul J. ; Caritis, Steve N. ; Leveno, Kenneth J. ; Wapner, Ronald J. ; Varner, Michael W. ; Iams, J. D. ; Moawad, Atef ; Miodovnik, Menachem ; Sibai, Baha ; Dombrowski, Mitchell ; Langer, Oded ; O'Sullivan, Mary J. / Midpregnancy genitourinary tract infection with Chlamydia trachomatis : Association with subsequent preterm delivery in women with bacterial vaginosis and Trichomonas vaginalis. In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2006 ; Vol. 194, No. 2. pp. 493-500.
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AU - Meis, Paul J.

AU - Caritis, Steve N.

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AU - Dombrowski, Mitchell

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AU - O'Sullivan, Mary J.

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KW - Low birth weight

KW - Preterm birth

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