Milestones: Critical elements in clinical informatics fellowship programs

Howard Silverman, Christoph U. Lehmann, Benson Munger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Milestones refer to points along a continuum of a competency from novice to expert. Resident and fellow assessment and program evaluation processes adopted by the ACGME include the mandate that programs report the educational progress of residents and fellows twice annually utilizing Milestones developed by a specialty specific ACGME working group of experts. Milestones in clinical training programs are largely unmapped to specific assessment tools. Residents and fellows are mainly assessed using locally derived assessment instruments. These assessments are then reviewed by the Clinical Competency Committee which assigns and reports trainee ratings using the specialty specific reporting Milestones. Methods and Results: The challenge and opportunity facing the nascent specialty of Clinical Informatics is how to optimally utilize this framework across a growing number of accredited fellowships. The authors review how a mapped milestone framework, in which each required sub-competency is mapped to a single milestone assessment grid, can enable the use of milestones for multiple uses including individualized learning plans, fellow assessments, and program evaluation. Furthermore, such a mapped strategy will foster the ability to compare fellow progress within and between Clinical Informatics Fellowships in a structured and reliable fashion. Clinical Informatics currently has far less variability across programs and thus could easily utilize a more tightly defined set of milestones with a clear mapping to sub-competencies. This approach would enable greater standardization of assessment instruments and processes across programs while allowing for variability in how those sub-competencies are taught. Conclusions: A mapped strategy for Milestones offers significant advantages for Clinical Informatics programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)177-190
Number of pages14
JournalApplied Clinical Informatics
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 23 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Medical Informatics
Program Evaluation
Standardization
Aptitude
Clinical Competence
Process Assessment (Health Care)
Learning
Education

Keywords

  • Clinical informatics
  • Education
  • General healthcare providers
  • Physician
  • Professional training
  • Training and education requirements

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Informatics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Health Information Management

Cite this

Milestones : Critical elements in clinical informatics fellowship programs. / Silverman, Howard; Lehmann, Christoph U.; Munger, Benson.

In: Applied Clinical Informatics, Vol. 7, No. 1, 23.03.2016, p. 177-190.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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