Mirth, laughter and gelastic seizures

Santiago Arroyo, Ronald P. Lesser, Barry Gordon, Sumio Uematsu, John Hart, Pamela Schwerdt, Kati Andreasson, Robert S. Fisher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

219 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Little is known about what pathways subserve mirth and its expression laughter. We present three patients with gelastic seizures and laughter elicited by electrical stimulation of the cortex who provide some insight into the mechanisms of laughter and its emotional concomitants. The first patient had seizures manifested by laughter without a subjective feeling of mirth. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a cavernous haemangioma in the left superior mesial frontal region. Ictal subdural electrode recording showed the seizure onset to be in the left anterior cingulate gyrus. Removal of the lesion and of the seizure focus rendered the patient virtually seizure free over 16 months of follow-up. The other two patients had complex partial seizures of temporal lobe origin. Electrical stimulation of the fusiform gyrus and parahippocampal gyrus produced bursts of laughter accompanied by a feeling of mirth. These cases reveal a high likelihood of cingulate and basal temporal cortex contribution to laughter and mirth in humans, and suggest the possibility that the anterior cingulate region is involved in the motor act of laughter, while the basal temporal cortex is involved in processing of laughter's emotional content in man.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)757-780
Number of pages24
JournalBrain
Volume116
Issue number4
StatePublished - Aug 1993

Fingerprint

Laughter
Cortex
seizures
Magnetic resonance imaging
Seizures
Electrodes
Processing
Gyrus Cinguli
Temporal Lobe
cortex
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Burst
Electrode
Pathway
Likelihood
hemangioma
Partial
Electric Stimulation
Emotions
stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Statistics, Probability and Uncertainty
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Mathematics(all)
  • Statistics and Probability
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Arroyo, S., Lesser, R. P., Gordon, B., Uematsu, S., Hart, J., Schwerdt, P., ... Fisher, R. S. (1993). Mirth, laughter and gelastic seizures. Brain, 116(4), 757-780.

Mirth, laughter and gelastic seizures. / Arroyo, Santiago; Lesser, Ronald P.; Gordon, Barry; Uematsu, Sumio; Hart, John; Schwerdt, Pamela; Andreasson, Kati; Fisher, Robert S.

In: Brain, Vol. 116, No. 4, 08.1993, p. 757-780.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Arroyo, S, Lesser, RP, Gordon, B, Uematsu, S, Hart, J, Schwerdt, P, Andreasson, K & Fisher, RS 1993, 'Mirth, laughter and gelastic seizures', Brain, vol. 116, no. 4, pp. 757-780.
Arroyo S, Lesser RP, Gordon B, Uematsu S, Hart J, Schwerdt P et al. Mirth, laughter and gelastic seizures. Brain. 1993 Aug;116(4):757-780.
Arroyo, Santiago ; Lesser, Ronald P. ; Gordon, Barry ; Uematsu, Sumio ; Hart, John ; Schwerdt, Pamela ; Andreasson, Kati ; Fisher, Robert S. / Mirth, laughter and gelastic seizures. In: Brain. 1993 ; Vol. 116, No. 4. pp. 757-780.
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