Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species promote production of proinflammatory cytokines and are elevated in TNFR1-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS)

Ariel C. Bulua, Anna Simon, Ravikanth Maddipati, Martin Pelletier, Heiyoung Park, Kye Young Kim, Michael N. Sack, Daniel L. Kastner, Richard M. Siegel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have an established role in inflammation and host defense, as they kill intracellular bacteria and have been shown to activate the NLRP3 inflammasome. Here, we find that ROS generated by mitochondrial respiration are important for normal lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-driven production of several proinflammatory cytokines and for the enhanced responsiveness to LPS seen in cells from patients with tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), an autoinflammatory disorder caused by missense mutations in the type 1 TNF receptor (TNFR1). We find elevated baseline ROS in both mouse embryonic fibroblasts and human immune cells harboring TRAPS-associated TNFR1 mutations. A variety of antioxidants dampen LPS-induced MAPK phosphorylation and inflammatory cytokine production. However, gp91phox and p22phox reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase subunits are dispensable for inflammatory cytokine production, indicating that NADPH oxidases are not the source of proinflammatory ROS. TNFR1 mutant cells exhibit altered mitochondrial function with enhanced oxidative capacity and mitochondrial ROS generation, and pharmacological blockade of mitochondrial ROS efficiently reduces inflammatory cytokine production after LPS stimulation in cells from TRAPS patients and healthy controls. These findings suggest that mitochondrial ROS may be a novel therapeutic target for TRAPS and other inflammatory diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)519-533
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Experimental Medicine
Volume208
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 14 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor, Type I
Reactive Oxygen Species
Cytokines
Lipopolysaccharides
NADP
Oxidoreductases
Inflammasomes
Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptors
Missense Mutation
Respiration
Fibroblasts
Antioxidants
Phosphorylation
Pharmacology
Inflammation
Bacteria
Mutation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species promote production of proinflammatory cytokines and are elevated in TNFR1-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS). / Bulua, Ariel C.; Simon, Anna; Maddipati, Ravikanth; Pelletier, Martin; Park, Heiyoung; Kim, Kye Young; Sack, Michael N.; Kastner, Daniel L.; Siegel, Richard M.

In: Journal of Experimental Medicine, Vol. 208, No. 3, 14.03.2011, p. 519-533.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bulua, Ariel C. ; Simon, Anna ; Maddipati, Ravikanth ; Pelletier, Martin ; Park, Heiyoung ; Kim, Kye Young ; Sack, Michael N. ; Kastner, Daniel L. ; Siegel, Richard M. / Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species promote production of proinflammatory cytokines and are elevated in TNFR1-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS). In: Journal of Experimental Medicine. 2011 ; Vol. 208, No. 3. pp. 519-533.
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