Mobile Health Technology Can Objectively Capture Physical Activity (PA) Targets Among African-American Women Within Resource-Limited Communities—the Washington, D.C. Cardiovascular Health and Needs Assessment

S. Thomas, L. Yingling, J. Adu-Brimpong, V. Mitchell, C. R. Ayers, G. R. Wallen, M. Peters-Lawrence, A. T. Brooks, D. M. Sampson, K. L. Wiley, J. Saygbe, J. Henry, A. Johnson, A. Graham, L. Graham, T. M. Powell-Wiley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Little is understood about using mobile health (mHealth) technology to improve cardiovascular (CV) health among African-American women in resource-limited communities. Methods: We conducted the Washington, D.C. CV Health and Needs Assessment in predominantly African-American churches in city wards 5, 7, and 8 with the lowest socioeconomic status based on community-based participatory research (CBPR) principles. The assessment measured CV health factors: body mass index (BMI), fasting blood glucose and cholesterol, blood pressure, fruit/vegetable (F/V) intake, physical activity (PA), and smoking. Participants were trained to use a PA monitoring wristband to measure 30 days of PA, wirelessly upload the PA data to hubs at the participating churches, and access their data from a church/home computer. CV health factors were compared across weight classes. Results: Among females (N = 78; 99 % African-American; mean age = 59 years), 90 % had a BMI categorized as overweight/obese. Across weight classes, PA decreased and self-reported sedentary time (ST) increased (p ≤ 0.05). Diastolic blood pressure and glucose increased across weight classes (p ≤ 0.05); however, cholesterol, glucose, and BP were near intermediate CV health goals. Conclusions: Decreased PA and increased ST are potential community intervention targets for overweight and obese African-American women in resource-limited Washington D.C. areas. mHealth technology can assist in adapting CBPR intervention resources to improve PA for African-American women in resource-limited communities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)876-883
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities
Volume4
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2017

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular health disparities
  • Obesity
  • Women
  • mHealth technology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Anthropology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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