Molecular components of the mammalian circadian clock

Caroline H. Ko, Joseph S. Takahashi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

983 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Circadian rhythms are ∼24-h oscillations in behavior and physiology, which are internally generated and function to anticipate the environmental changes associated with the solar day. A conserved transcriptional-translational autoregulatory loop generates molecular oscillations of 'clock genes' at the cellular level. In mammals, the circadian system is organized in a hierarchical manner, in which a master pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) regulates downstream oscillators in peripheral tissues. Recent findings have revealed that the clock is cell-autonomous and self-sustained not only in a central pacemaker, the SCN, but also in peripheral tissues and in dissociated cultured cells. It is becoming evident that specific contribution of each clock component and interactions among the components vary in a tissue-specific manner. Here, we review the general mechanisms of the circadian clockwork, describe recent findings that elucidate tissue-specific expression patterns of the clock genes and address the importance of circadian regulation in peripheral tissues for an organism's overall well-being.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalHuman Molecular Genetics
Volume15
Issue numberSUPPL. 2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 15 2006

Fingerprint

Circadian Clocks
Suprachiasmatic Nucleus
Circadian Rhythm
Genes
Mammals
Cultured Cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics

Cite this

Molecular components of the mammalian circadian clock. / Ko, Caroline H.; Takahashi, Joseph S.

In: Human Molecular Genetics, Vol. 15, No. SUPPL. 2, 15.10.2006.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{3a01c1ffb5f44c6eb7e83fd9e7ab7ebf,
title = "Molecular components of the mammalian circadian clock",
abstract = "Circadian rhythms are ∼24-h oscillations in behavior and physiology, which are internally generated and function to anticipate the environmental changes associated with the solar day. A conserved transcriptional-translational autoregulatory loop generates molecular oscillations of 'clock genes' at the cellular level. In mammals, the circadian system is organized in a hierarchical manner, in which a master pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) regulates downstream oscillators in peripheral tissues. Recent findings have revealed that the clock is cell-autonomous and self-sustained not only in a central pacemaker, the SCN, but also in peripheral tissues and in dissociated cultured cells. It is becoming evident that specific contribution of each clock component and interactions among the components vary in a tissue-specific manner. Here, we review the general mechanisms of the circadian clockwork, describe recent findings that elucidate tissue-specific expression patterns of the clock genes and address the importance of circadian regulation in peripheral tissues for an organism's overall well-being.",
author = "Ko, {Caroline H.} and Takahashi, {Joseph S.}",
year = "2006",
month = "10",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1093/hmg/ddl207",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "15",
journal = "Human Molecular Genetics",
issn = "0964-6906",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "SUPPL. 2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Molecular components of the mammalian circadian clock

AU - Ko, Caroline H.

AU - Takahashi, Joseph S.

PY - 2006/10/15

Y1 - 2006/10/15

N2 - Circadian rhythms are ∼24-h oscillations in behavior and physiology, which are internally generated and function to anticipate the environmental changes associated with the solar day. A conserved transcriptional-translational autoregulatory loop generates molecular oscillations of 'clock genes' at the cellular level. In mammals, the circadian system is organized in a hierarchical manner, in which a master pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) regulates downstream oscillators in peripheral tissues. Recent findings have revealed that the clock is cell-autonomous and self-sustained not only in a central pacemaker, the SCN, but also in peripheral tissues and in dissociated cultured cells. It is becoming evident that specific contribution of each clock component and interactions among the components vary in a tissue-specific manner. Here, we review the general mechanisms of the circadian clockwork, describe recent findings that elucidate tissue-specific expression patterns of the clock genes and address the importance of circadian regulation in peripheral tissues for an organism's overall well-being.

AB - Circadian rhythms are ∼24-h oscillations in behavior and physiology, which are internally generated and function to anticipate the environmental changes associated with the solar day. A conserved transcriptional-translational autoregulatory loop generates molecular oscillations of 'clock genes' at the cellular level. In mammals, the circadian system is organized in a hierarchical manner, in which a master pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) regulates downstream oscillators in peripheral tissues. Recent findings have revealed that the clock is cell-autonomous and self-sustained not only in a central pacemaker, the SCN, but also in peripheral tissues and in dissociated cultured cells. It is becoming evident that specific contribution of each clock component and interactions among the components vary in a tissue-specific manner. Here, we review the general mechanisms of the circadian clockwork, describe recent findings that elucidate tissue-specific expression patterns of the clock genes and address the importance of circadian regulation in peripheral tissues for an organism's overall well-being.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33749031807&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33749031807&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/hmg/ddl207

DO - 10.1093/hmg/ddl207

M3 - Article

C2 - 16987893

AN - SCOPUS:33749031807

VL - 15

JO - Human Molecular Genetics

JF - Human Molecular Genetics

SN - 0964-6906

IS - SUPPL. 2

ER -