Morphea patients with mucocutaneous involvement: A cross-sectional study from the Morphea in Adults and Children (MAC) cohort

Smriti Prasad, Samantha M. Black, Jane L. Zhu, Shivani Sharma, Heidi Jacobe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Demographic and clinical findings of patients with mucocutaneous morphea have not been well characterized, to our knowledge. Objective: To determine the demographic and clinical characteristics of morphea patients with mucocutaneous lesions who were enrolled in the Morphea in Adults and Children cohort. Methods: Cross-sectional study of 735 patients in the Morphea in Adults and Children cohort from 2007 to 2018. Results: A total of 4.6% of linear morphea patients had oral involvement versus 2.4% among the entire cohort, whereas 10.3% of generalized morphea patients had genital involvement versus 3.7% among the entire cohort. Patients with genital lesions were older at disease onset than those with oral morphea (57 versus 11.5 years; P <.001) and had more frequent extragenital lichen sclerosus et atrophicus (59.2% versus 5.6%; P =.004). Limitations: Selection bias and limited number of affected subjects. Conclusion: Oral morphea lesions predominate in younger patients with facial linear morphea, whereas genital lesions predominate in postmenopausal women with overlying extragenital lichen sclerosus et atrophicus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)114-120
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume85
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2021

Keywords

  • Localized Scleroderma Activity Index
  • Localized Scleroderma Damage Index
  • Physician Global Assessment of Disease Activity
  • Physician Global Assessment of Disease Damage
  • lichen sclerosus atrophicus
  • localized scleroderma
  • morphea
  • mucocutaneous morphea

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

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